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UnkleRhaukus

  • 2 years ago

The Strong and weak Nuclear forces have a range: explain

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  1. sachin_vishaul
    • 2 years ago
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    u see every thing has a range so why not strong and weak nuclear forces have a range

  2. UnkleRhaukus
    • 2 years ago
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    well the gravitational and electromagnetic forces do not a a range, they just decrease with r^2, how does the uncertainty principle effect the nuclear forces/

  3. mth3v4
    • 2 years ago
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    emmm, range between themselves between the nucleus

  4. UnkleRhaukus
    • 2 years ago
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    why are they not simply inversely proportional to r^2

  5. mth3v4
    • 2 years ago
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    so i take it you mean both i think it has something to do with fourier transform for uncertanty principle http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fourier_transform and laplace trnsforms the functions on what they are used for http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Laplace_transform

  6. mth3v4
    • 2 years ago
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    i think at least

  7. UnkleRhaukus
    • 2 years ago
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    oh

  8. mth3v4
    • 2 years ago
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    that is what i see at least its for what the functions of what those "things" do not much about the forces themselves i could say that it is calculated that way because... fourier used for non symetric measurement weak force more difficult to measure the change of movement strong force laplace used for symetric measurement gravitational electromagnetic the forces do not change if there are changes they can be measured

  9. daniel.duque
    • 2 years ago
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    A function has a range if you can write it as \[f=Af(r/\lambda) \]. A 1/r^2 law cannot be given a range, since A and lambda are then mixed. An exponential exp(-r/lambda), on the other hand, has a range. Afaik, a range appears when the mediating particle has a rest mass. Photons and gravitons have no rest mass, so the interactions mediated by those (EM and gravity) have no range. Nuclear forces, strong and weak, are mediated by massive bosons and therefore acquire a range.

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