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anonymous

  • 4 years ago

how do you make a game?

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  1. anonymous
    • 4 years ago
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    Building a game will involve some programming

  2. anonymous
    • 4 years ago
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    this should help you.. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Video_game

  3. anonymous
    • 4 years ago
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    thank you

  4. anonymous
    • 4 years ago
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    Wait it depends internet game or a video game

  5. anonymous
    • 4 years ago
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    That's a loaded question if I ever heard one. You'll need a design. What's your game about? How do the gameplay mechanics work, how do the controls function, what are the major goals the player needs to achieve? What's the look and feel you're going for? Write it all down in a structured form. Once you've got a rough outline, start filling it in with details that describe exactly how each piece works. The design document is important because it'll give you a road map to follow during implementation. For big AAA titles, design documents >600 pages are not uncommon (not saying that's what you'll need, but trying to emphasize the importance of it). You'll also need art (I'm assuming you'll want some sort of graphical representation of the game environment and characters). This usually starts with concepts done in pencil or Photoshop, that are then refined to final assets or modeled in 3D (if it's a 3D game) using Maya/Blender/3DSMax or similar software. Then you can start programming the necessary foundation for the game - loading the art assets, displaying environment and characters, making the player move through the environment, interacting with relevant gameplay entities, etc. pp. At some point you'll likely also want to write custom tools such as a level editor, if existing off-the-shelf software isn't sufficient. You can use existing middleware such as Unity or UDK, or roll your own game engine if existing ones aren't a good fit for what you're trying to do. Start small and focus on two or three core gameplay mechanics. Get help (people who know how to make the art assets, sounds, images, you need, or that can help programming).

  6. anonymous
    • 4 years ago
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    @opiesche Great answer. Have you worked in the games industry? :-D

  7. anonymous
    • 4 years ago
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    Thanks. Yeah, still do :P

  8. anonymous
    • 4 years ago
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    try to learn python programming language + pygame, its good starting point to make game since python programming language is free and easy to learn

  9. anonymous
    • 4 years ago
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    That's actually a great suggestion to start with the basics. Pygame takes a lot of the leg work out of the equation and lets you focus more on what's specific to making small games rather than building the necessary infrastructure. +1, Alif!

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