anonymous
  • anonymous
Which statement about the narrator's son is the best example of pathos? The boy had a good appetite, so I didn't have to make him eat." "He was four, a little brown boy in blue rompers, and when he talked and laughed. . .his voice was soft. . ." *"I could hear the boy crying in just that note no other child has, and when I came completely around I found him standing. . .with tears on his face." "He would play with the ball. . .poor little rascal, he would play until he grew sick of playing." Identify whether the following sentence has a misplaced modifier or a dangling modif
English
jamiebookeater
  • jamiebookeater
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At vero eos et accusamus et iusto odio dignissimos ducimus qui blanditiis praesentium voluptatum deleniti atque corrupti quos dolores et quas molestias excepturi sint occaecati cupiditate non provident, similique sunt in culpa qui officia deserunt mollitia animi, id est laborum et dolorum fuga. Et harum quidem rerum facilis est et expedita distinctio. Nam libero tempore, cum soluta nobis est eligendi optio cumque nihil impedit quo minus id quod maxime placeat facere possimus, omnis voluptas assumenda est, omnis dolor repellendus. Itaque earum rerum hic tenetur a sapiente delectus, ut aut reiciendis voluptatibus maiores alias consequatur aut perferendis doloribus asperiores repellat.

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anonymous
  • anonymous
Pathos? Spelling Errors
anonymous
  • anonymous
Didn't put in the rest of the question... Identify whether the following sentence has a misplaced modifier or a dangling modifier. We saw three fires flying over the forest. *misplaced dangling Put an (8) next to may answers, Thanks for the help!
anonymous
  • anonymous
Pathos as in the Greek word (used in english) that means "suffering" "sorrow" or pity envoking. Root for words like sympathy. Starting to think the answer may be the 3rd one. and I meant an (*) not an (8).

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anonymous
  • anonymous
I'd say you're right, on both counts. In its original application, from which we borrow the term, "pathos" meant the passions, suffering, or deep feeling. In literary criticism today, it generally refers to a scene or a passage designed to evoke feeling of tenderness, pity, or sympathetic [and there's the word again as a root in an English word] sorrow. Of the four sentences, the one you point to seems to come closest to that. Then, in the problem sentence, the modifier is indeed misplaced. The subject of "flying over the forest" is "we" and it does appear in the sentence. The phrase "flying over the forest" is thus only misplaced. If its subject did not appear at all in the sentence, it would be dangling. The fix is easy: "Flying over the forest, we saw three fires." Good going!

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