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anonymous

  • 4 years ago

Consider a w-N weight suspended by two wires as shown in the accompanying figure. If the magnitude of the vector F sub 2 is 110 N, find w and the vector F sub 1:

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  1. anonymous
    • 4 years ago
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    |dw:1328415051107:dw|

  2. anonymous
    • 4 years ago
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    thats what i am trying to find

  3. anonymous
    • 4 years ago
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    F2 is 110 N as stated in my problem

  4. bahrom7893
    • 4 years ago
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    wait what are u trying to find?

  5. anonymous
    • 4 years ago
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    right, but i need to find w=weight of obejct and magnitude of F sub 1

  6. anonymous
    • 4 years ago
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    physics?

  7. anonymous
    • 4 years ago
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    that is how the problem is written

  8. anonymous
    • 4 years ago
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    i believe a system should solve this, with the understanding f sub 1 + F sub 2=w, cant seem too put it together though

  9. anonymous
    • 4 years ago
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    how about ratio and proportion to find the value of the magnitude of F sub 1|dw:1328416025545:dw| you can find the value of F sub 1. and since you said that F sub 1 + F sub 2=w, plug the values to find weight. . but i'm not sure. .

  10. anonymous
    • 4 years ago
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    what answer do you get for the magnitude of Fsub 1

  11. anonymous
    • 4 years ago
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    |dw:1328416246651:dw| i don't have calculator. .

  12. anonymous
    • 4 years ago
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    i have 124.47 N

  13. anonymous
    • 4 years ago
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    the answer was 148.554..

  14. anonymous
    • 4 years ago
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    break it into components. Vector(F1)+vector(f2)+vector(w)=0. Vector f1=magf1<-cos(t1),Sin(t1)> Vector f2=magf2<cos(t2),sin(t2)> X components add to zero -magf1cos(43)+110cos(38)=0 Solve for magf1 and plug into: y components: magf1sin(43)+110sin(38)=w

  15. anonymous
    • 4 years ago
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    and that made me wrong. .lol

  16. anonymous
    • 4 years ago
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    how do the x components add to zero

  17. anonymous
    • 4 years ago
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    instantaneously/or not hah is not in motion. There is no movement in the x direction. Weight is a downward vector so it has no x component. Thus F1 and F2's x components add to zero.

  18. anonymous
    • 4 years ago
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    im am still not sure

  19. anonymous
    • 4 years ago
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    d|dw:1328417056124:dw| You have these three vectors to worry about. Adding the x components gives you zero even if you include the weight vector because as you can see in the picture weight has a x-component of zero.

  20. anonymous
    • 4 years ago
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    they add to zero because there is no movement.

  21. anonymous
    • 4 years ago
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    there is also no movement in the y direction but weight has a -y component.

  22. anonymous
    • 4 years ago
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    even if they have different angles, like cos43 and cos 38

  23. anonymous
    • 4 years ago
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    those indicate the direction of the vectors. Multiplying them by the magnitude will give you your components.

  24. anonymous
    • 4 years ago
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    Notice how I put magf1<-x,y> for vector f1. That vector has a negative x component.

  25. anonymous
    • 4 years ago
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    So in my example, based on how you did it, my magnitude for f1 would be given by:|dw:1328417583344:dw|

  26. anonymous
    • 4 years ago
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    ?

  27. anonymous
    • 4 years ago
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    Did you say you have the answers to this problem?

  28. anonymous
    • 4 years ago
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    but yes that should be the magnitude of f1 by algebraic methods

  29. anonymous
    • 4 years ago
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    its like 148.55...something

  30. anonymous
    • 4 years ago
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    for the weight right?

  31. anonymous
    • 4 years ago
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    yes for the weight

  32. anonymous
    • 4 years ago
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    okay yeah you should be getting 118.52.. for f1

  33. anonymous
    • 4 years ago
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    more importantly do you understand?

  34. anonymous
    • 4 years ago
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    yes i do thank you very much

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