A community for students.

Here's the question you clicked on:

55 members online
  • 0 replying
  • 0 viewing

anonymous

  • 4 years ago

an aqueous solution of potassium carbonate combine with a solution of calcium nitrate. what are the total and net ionic equation?

  • This Question is Closed
  1. Xishem
    • 4 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 2

    \[K_2CO_3(aq)+Ca(NO_3)_2(aq) \rightarrow \ ?\]If we break these two reactants up into their respective ions, we get...\[K^++CO_3^{2-}+Ca^{2+}+NO_3^{-}\]If we combine the anion of one reactant with the cation of the other and vice-versa, we get...\[CaCO_3+KNO_3\]Now we need to ask ourselves if either of these is soluble in water. Based on solubility rules, we know that all nitrates are soluble, so the potassium nitrate is. Alternatively, we know that all carbonates are insoluble except those of sodium, potassium, and ammonium; therefore, this calcium carbonate is insoluble. This is good. It means we have a driving force for the reaction! That driving force is that a precipitate will form. In such a case, a precipitation reaction will occur, and the total equation will be...\[K_2CO_3(aq)+Ca(NO_3)_2(aq) \rightarrow CaCO_3(s)+2KNO_3(aq)\]To determine the net ionic equation, we need to remove all ions that appear on both sides of the equation in aqueous solution -- these ions are called spectator ions, and do not actually undergo any chemical reaction. To determine the net ionic equation, let's first rewrite the equation in terms of ions...\[2K^+(aq)+CO_3^{2-}(aq)+Ca^{2+}(aq)+2NO_3^{-}(aq) \rightarrow Ca^{2+}(s)+CO_3^{2-}(s)+2K^+(aq)+2NO_3^-(aq)\]The species that appear in aqueous solution on both sides of the equation (spectator ions) are... \[2K^+,NO_3^-\]If we remove these spectator ions from the total equation, we will get the net ionic equation...\[CO_3^{2-}(aq)+Ca^{2+}(aq) \rightarrow CaCO_3(s)\]

  2. anonymous
    • 4 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    thanks you really break things down i greatly appreciat it

  3. Xishem
    • 4 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 2

    No problem. If you are uncertain of the meaning about anything I've described, feel free to ask (:.

  4. anonymous
    • 4 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    ok

  5. Not the answer you are looking for?
    Search for more explanations.

    • Attachments:

Ask your own question

Sign Up
Find more explanations on OpenStudy
Privacy Policy

Your question is ready. Sign up for free to start getting answers.

spraguer (Moderator)
5 → View Detailed Profile

is replying to Can someone tell me what button the professor is hitting...

23

  • Teamwork 19 Teammate
  • Problem Solving 19 Hero
  • You have blocked this person.
  • ✔ You're a fan Checking fan status...

Thanks for being so helpful in mathematics. If you are getting quality help, make sure you spread the word about OpenStudy.

This is the testimonial you wrote.
You haven't written a testimonial for Owlfred.