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anonymous

  • 4 years ago

Parallel and Perpendicular Lines: Solve: 7. Given: P(-4,1), Q(2,3), R(4,9), S(-2, 7). A. Graph quad PQRS. B. What is the slope of --PQ?(Suppose to be under the line) and of --PS?(Suppose to be under.) C. What is the slope of --QR?(Suppose to be under.) and of --PS?(Suppose to be under.) D.Use slopes to show that the diagnoals of quad. PQRS are perpendicular. E. What kind of quadrilateral is PQRS? Explain. Show Work (: and Please Help!

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  1. Hero
    • 4 years ago
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    Have you graphed it yet?

  2. anonymous
    • 4 years ago
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    Yes, I have already graphed it.

  3. Hero
    • 4 years ago
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    Okay, so what is the next step?

  4. anonymous
    • 4 years ago
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    There is just really 2 of the parts I don't understand.

  5. anonymous
    • 4 years ago
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    I don't understand how to C. and D. After I find the Slope's.

  6. Hero
    • 4 years ago
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    Okay, hold on for a minute

  7. anonymous
    • 4 years ago
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    Alright (:

  8. Hero
    • 4 years ago
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    Hmmm, yeah this is interesting. I personally wouldn't prove them to be perpendicular using the method they suggest.

  9. Hero
    • 4 years ago
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    They give you the points, so I would have used the slopes of the diagonals, not the quadrilateral, to prove that their perpendicular to each other.

  10. anonymous
    • 4 years ago
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    I'm sorry It was D. & E. I was reading the wrong one lol.

  11. Hero
    • 4 years ago
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    I know that it is a rhombus

  12. Hero
    • 4 years ago
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    But I think it's silly to try to use the slope to prove that the diagonals are perpendicular

  13. anonymous
    • 4 years ago
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    I would show it for it to be Perpendicular though?

  14. Hero
    • 4 years ago
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    But actually, the slopes are the same for all four sides so that might be a clue as far as the properties of a rhombus go.

  15. anonymous
    • 4 years ago
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    So they are all the same?

  16. anonymous
    • 4 years ago
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    Soooo???

  17. Hero
    • 4 years ago
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    Yes, what are the properties of a rhombus? All four sides equal, right?

  18. Hero
    • 4 years ago
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    If all four sides have the same slope, they must be equal in length. It is not possible for a quadrilateral to have four sides with the same slope and the sides not be equal

  19. anonymous
    • 4 years ago
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    So, If it would be Perpendicular would you flip the slope and make it negative?

  20. Hero
    • 4 years ago
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    If all four sides of a quadrilateral are equal, by definition, it is a rhombus. Therefore, the diagonals will be perpendicular.

  21. anonymous
    • 4 years ago
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    So is that my answer for D.?

  22. Hero
    • 4 years ago
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    Pretty much

  23. anonymous
    • 4 years ago
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    Alright Thanks. (:

  24. Hero
    • 4 years ago
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    I admit, it's not a direct proof or anything like that.

  25. Hero
    • 4 years ago
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    You should have asked your instructor what kind of proof he or she wanted

  26. anonymous
    • 4 years ago
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    Yeah, I should have. I asked her at the end of the day on Friday and she just said to figure what it would be after you find the slope and perpendicualar.

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