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anonymous

  • 4 years ago

Find the average velocity of the object from points A to B, B to C , and A to C .

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  1. anonymous
    • 4 years ago
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    |dw:1328486272548:dw|

  2. anonymous
    • 4 years ago
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    the points are a(0)=0 B(3)=25 c(6)=0

  3. anonymous
    • 4 years ago
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    My answer was 8.33,7, and zero

  4. anonymous
    • 4 years ago
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    i mean -7

  5. anonymous
    • 4 years ago
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    Average velocity is given by [f(b)-f(a)]/b-a. So, for the first part, you'd want to do [f(3)-f(0)]/3-0

  6. anonymous
    • 4 years ago
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    i did that

  7. anonymous
    • 4 years ago
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    Then what is your question?

  8. anonymous
    • 4 years ago
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    my answer is wrong

  9. anonymous
    • 4 years ago
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    can you solve for it and tell me if our answers match up

  10. anonymous
    • 4 years ago
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    Yes

  11. anonymous
    • 4 years ago
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    Okay. What I get is this: [25-0]/[3] = 8.333 That should be correct. Next, [f(6)-f(3)]/(6-3) = (0-25)/3 = -8.333 And lastly: [f(6)-f(0)]/(6-0) = (0-0)/6 = 0

  12. anonymous
    • 4 years ago
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    why is the second one 8.33

  13. anonymous
    • 4 years ago
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    ohh i apologize you are right thank you

  14. anonymous
    • 4 years ago
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    Well, a good way to look at this visually is to look at the graph: I'm assuming that that parabola is symmetrical. The curve comes up at the average velocity (slope) of 8.333. Then it comes back down with a similar slope, but negative. Hence the -8.333

  15. anonymous
    • 4 years ago
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    Oh, good! I'm glad!

  16. anonymous
    • 4 years ago
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    can you also help me with this For the intervals in above would the average speed be less than, equal to, or greater than the values you found in that Part?

  17. anonymous
    • 4 years ago
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    Yes, let me think for a moment.

  18. anonymous
    • 4 years ago
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    Well, speed is different from velocity in the fact that velocity has direction. For example, the answer we got from A to B and B to C were the same except for their sign, right? That's because velocity is specific to the direction. A to B was going up, B to C was going down. Speed doesn't have that distinction. If you were to take the average speed from A to B, it'd be the same, but from B to C, speed doesn't care about direction; it would be 8.333 without the negative. Does that help?

  19. anonymous
    • 4 years ago
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    so speed and velocity are the same magnitude but speed doesnt have direction . so speed tells you how fast you are going but not where you going

  20. anonymous
    • 4 years ago
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    Yes! So do you think the average speed from B to C would be greater than, equal to, or less than the average velocity from B to C?

  21. anonymous
    • 4 years ago
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    i think it would be greater

  22. anonymous
    • 4 years ago
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    I would agree :)

  23. anonymous
    • 4 years ago
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    how about from ac

  24. anonymous
    • 4 years ago
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    As far as I know, there would be no change from average velocity to average speed.

  25. anonymous
    • 4 years ago
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    the answer choices has one of the them stay equal and the other 2 be greater

  26. anonymous
    • 4 years ago
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    Could you list the available choices? Thanks.

  27. anonymous
    • 4 years ago
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    yah equal for ab, greater for bc, ac equal for bc, greater for ab ac equal for ac greater for ab ac

  28. anonymous
    • 4 years ago
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    Huh. One moment.

  29. anonymous
    • 4 years ago
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    yah i know

  30. anonymous
    • 4 years ago
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    Oh. Okay. I think I know. So, we said that the velocity from A to B was 8.333, right? And we said that the velocity from B to C was -8.333. If you wanted to find the average for the entire thing, you would do (8.333+[-8.333])/2. Make sense? You just add them (because they cover the entire graph and divide it to find average. Now, let's look at speed. We decided that from A to B stayed the same: 8.333, but we also decided that B to C changed to 8.333. Let's take the average:

  31. anonymous
    • 4 years ago
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    (8.333+8.333)/2. This is the average from A to C! And it's greater with speed than it is velocity! That answers our question, I think. Same for AB, but greater for BC and AC.

  32. anonymous
    • 4 years ago
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    Did you follow that?

  33. anonymous
    • 4 years ago
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    kinda of im a little confused to be honest

  34. anonymous
    • 4 years ago
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    Okay. Let's see if I can clear this up.

  35. anonymous
    • 4 years ago
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    The average velocity of the entire curve can be obtained by adding together the avg velocity of one half of the curve and the other half and then dividing it by 2. Does that make sense?

  36. anonymous
    • 4 years ago
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    yah

  37. anonymous
    • 4 years ago
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    Okay, and the average velocity for the entire curve is the same thing as average velocity from A to C, yes?

  38. anonymous
    • 4 years ago
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    yah bevause the entire curve goes from a to c

  39. anonymous
    • 4 years ago
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    Our velocity: \[[8.333+(-8.333)]\div2\] Our speed: [8.333+8.333]div2 Do you see and understand the difference?

  40. anonymous
    • 4 years ago
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    Oops.\[[8.333+8.333]\div2 \]

  41. anonymous
    • 4 years ago
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    yah our velocity is zero and our speed is somethings else

  42. anonymous
    • 4 years ago
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    so it shows that it changed?

  43. anonymous
    • 4 years ago
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    Right! And did it become greater than or less than? What do you think?

  44. anonymous
    • 4 years ago
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    it became greater

  45. anonymous
    • 4 years ago
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    Yes. So, in conclusion, we agreed that AB is the same, BC is greater and just now, AC is also greater. Is that an option?

  46. anonymous
    • 4 years ago
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    yah you are right it is correct. so when we have tofind speed we have to always find the average

  47. anonymous
    • 4 years ago
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    Well, at this point, if you do not have a function for speed, you can only 'guess'. In Calculus it is possible to find the instantaneous speed, but otherwise you can only take averages.

  48. anonymous
    • 4 years ago
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    can you explain quickly how you find the average of anything

  49. anonymous
    • 4 years ago
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    Well, you add up all of the terms (whatever they may be) and then divide it by the number of terms. Good?

  50. anonymous
    • 4 years ago
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    but didnt we have 3 terms

  51. anonymous
    • 4 years ago
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    No, we had 1 half of the curve and the other half of the curve, so we divided by two, right?

  52. anonymous
    • 4 years ago
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    okay . sohow do we know if we have a function for speed

  53. anonymous
    • 4 years ago
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    Well, in the example you were just given a position function; the graph showed the position of the object over time. If the question had included a v(t) function, i.e. velocity over time, you could use it to find the velocity. Or, if the question had included a s(t) function, speed over time, you could use it to find the speed. Neither of these were included so we don't worry about it.

  54. anonymous
    • 4 years ago
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    so just as a refresher what is a function

  55. anonymous
    • 4 years ago
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    In general (and by no means is this an all inclusive definition) it is an equation that you put in an input (typically x) and receive and output (typically y). It has to pass the 'vertical line test' meaning that there are no two x values that equal the same y value.

  56. anonymous
    • 4 years ago
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    okay thank you for all your help and patience.

  57. anonymous
    • 4 years ago
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    You're welcome :) Good luck!

  58. anonymous
    • 4 years ago
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    thanks.

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