anonymous
  • anonymous
i just wanted to know which field involved more math meaning more numerical and calculations is it research in astrophysics or aerospace engineering
Physics
  • Stacey Warren - Expert brainly.com
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jamiebookeater
  • jamiebookeater
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anonymous
  • anonymous
Neither. No professional does numerical calculations in his daily work. That's what calculators, computers, and student interns are for. Both fields involve math -- but in the sense of knowing the ideas of math, how to set up problems in math (which you give to a computer to solve), what can and can't be easily solved, how to derive new equations that describe measurements -- things like that. In short, the ideas and concepts of math, but not much about its details. You can be a first-class astrophysicist or aero-astro engineer and be unable to remember what 7 x 8 is. But you certainly need to know what that "x" means, and whether you can switch the numbers around, and how you could calculate it with a computer or a calculator, and what limitations there might be on the answer, and what, if anything changes when you change the sign, add decimal places, put in experimental uncertainty, and how to generalize the whole idea of multiplication to more complex things than numbers. In short, if you have the *idea* of math, or the nature of its ideas, then neither field will be good for you. But if you like the ideas of math, you can do quite well even if you're terrible at actually working out the details with paper and pencil. (You will have to work harder to get trained than someone who is also good at the details, however.)
anonymous
  • anonymous
Sorry, that first sentence in the last paragraph should begin "In short, if you hate the..."

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