anonymous
  • anonymous
Summerize the plot of "The Raven and the first men: The beginning's of Haida"?
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chestercat
  • chestercat
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anonymous
  • anonymous
Have you read this legend? Perhaps you could summarize it here for us? :)
jagatuba
  • jagatuba
I remember having to recite the Raven in my Comp I class in high school.
anonymous
  • anonymous
Different raven, yes? You mean the poem by Poe? The Haida are a native tribe in Alaska. The raven is apparently important in their culture. I know their totem poles often (always?) feature ravens. That's about all I know about it. Katy, try to explain in a condensed way what happens in the story and why it's important. Or what the point of the story is. Don't just retell the whole story in your own words. Extract the main ideas out. Does that make sense?

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jagatuba
  • jagatuba
Yes Poe's Raven. Sorry. lol Some how I read the question as "The Raven" AND "the first men: The beginning's of Haida".
jagatuba
  • jagatuba
Never heard of this legend.
anonymous
  • anonymous
Ah . . . well could be. Maybe so?
jagatuba
  • jagatuba
We covered a lot of myth in HUM/105, but not that one nor that tribe.
anonymous
  • anonymous
Doing a bit of searching . . . apparently, in the traditional Haida way of thinking, Raven created the world and the first men. There may well be variations of this tale, and we don't know which one this student read. She should still give the summary a try on her own first. Katy, a follow-up thought. If you want to post the version you read (as an attached file) and then your summary, someone here can take a look at it for you.
jagatuba
  • jagatuba
Perhaps we did cover that legend or a variant because it does sound familiar.
anonymous
  • anonymous
There you go, perhaps you did? There's a sculpture that must be well known -- it comes up frequently a Google search on this topic: http://www.billreidfoundation.org/banknote/raven.htm
jagatuba
  • jagatuba
I'm perusing my text book right now.
jagatuba
  • jagatuba
From the information that you have, would you say this is a creation myth? Just trying to narrow it down to a specific myth type.
anonymous
  • anonymous
Definitely. Raven creates the world and the first men.
anonymous
  • anonymous
I have found, like, four different versions online. This seems to be a freely adapted tale.
jagatuba
  • jagatuba
Okay found it. Only the one here is from the Apatac. Into this category [creation myths] we add accounts of such “accidents” as that recounted by various Eskimo tribes of the trickster Father Raven—Tulungersaq—who, according to an Apatac “telling,” is a “holy life power” crouching in the primordial darkness who suddenly awakens and begins to move about. Eventually, Father Raven plants the world’s first vegetation. One day, to his great surprise, the first man pushes his way out of a pea pod and human history begins. Indeed, trickster gods like Raven frequently lay their hands upon primeval matter intending one thing and producing another. “There is a telling,” begins a Coyote tale from America’s desert Southwest, of how Coyote accidentally put the stars in heaven when he shook open a sacred pouch in search of treasure. This theme may also be found among a number of tales from peoples ranging from Central Asia to Central Europe, including the ancient Siberians, Voguls, and Rumanians. In Vogul and Rumanian tradition, for example, Satan unwittingly speeds God’s creation of Earth when he lays his claws upon it in an effort to destroy it. Accretion and conjunction stories, then, demonstrate the creative potency of primal matter. Any action, whether that of wind or wave, or the earliest stirrings of a god or devil, unleashes the productive power sleeping in the primordial deep. - Scott Leonard & Michael McClure, 2004, Myth and Knowing. An Introduction to World Mythology Apparently, the Chuckchee tribe believed Raven urinated and defected the earth, and it's bodies of water. OMG I'm never drinking water again. lol j/k
anonymous
  • anonymous
Oh, thanks for the additional context! Blech, except for the fact that I'm going to be regarding my water suspiciously for several days now . . .
jagatuba
  • jagatuba
lol and yeah it was probably wise to not post that link. Better off found on one's own.
anonymous
  • anonymous
Ye-up. Well, we're having a fine time. Where did Katy go?! Katy, you'll be happy to know that your question sent the two of us skittering around to dig up source material on this legend. Please do let us know what you did with your summary! We'd love to see it, now that we're getting all caught up on the antics of Raven in the Haida mythology.

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