anonymous
  • anonymous
Can a molecule of C2 exist with tetra covalent bonds? Please justify.
Chemistry
  • Stacey Warren - Expert brainly.com
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katieb
  • katieb
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anonymous
  • anonymous
no it cant as in btw every atom there is max. 3 bonds can be formed not more than it as it become unstable and break down easily
anonymous
  • anonymous
Why more tahn 3 bonds can't exist? I have read that Carbon compounds r very stable.
anonymous
  • anonymous
yea as i said in between same atoms lik between C and c but there can be more bonds in different atoms depends on the covalency of atom

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anonymous
  • anonymous
Thanks a lot!!!!!!!!!
anonymous
  • anonymous
C2 is certainly a possible molecule, although it's not very stable, so probably only in the gas phase. And this molecule uses all 8 of the valence electrons available in two carbon atoms. However, it turns out the bonding order is 2, not 4, so the bond between the carbons would be interpreted as a double bond, not a quadruple bond. You can see this most easily in the MO diagram. Try here: http://www.meta-synthesis.com/webbook/39_diatomics/diatomics.html Essentially, one pair of electrons ends up in an antibonding MO, and this *subtracts* from the bonding order, make it 3 - 1 = 2. The situation you imagine, with a bonding order of 4, would require that pair to go into a bonding MO, so that it *added* to the bonding order. making it 3 + 1 = 4. As for why that pair goes into an antibonding MO, the answer is that that MO is lower in energy than any available bonding MO. What does that mean physically? Roughly speaking, as you add more and more electrons between the two carbon nuclei, there comes a point when the energy is lower if you add the next pair on the outside of the molecule (not in between the nuclei), because of all the electron-electron repulsion they would experience between the nuclei. From that position, the electrons act to pull the nuclei apart, i.e. act in an "antibonding" sort of way, and that reduces the final strength of the bond between the carbon atoms, so that it is more reasonable to call it a "double strength" = "double" bond, then a quadruple strength = quadruple bond. You may be a little trapped in the Lewis method of just sharing electrons pairs and counting up shared pairs to establish "number" of bonds. Keep in mind this is only a very simplified model of the actual physics going on, and there are things you can draw with a Lewis structure (like C2 with a quadruple bond) that don't make actual sense. It's sort of like the fact that you can build a model car out of LEGOs, but it is possible to build LEGO cars that do things real cars can't, or that look in ways that real cars do not. You would not assume that everything that is true about LEGO cars is true about real cars. Use the same caution when interpreting Lewis dot diagrams.

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