AravindG
  • AravindG
what is head on collision?
Physics
  • Stacey Warren - Expert brainly.com
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schrodinger
  • schrodinger
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ash2326
  • ash2326
Both the bodies approaching towards each other and collide.
anonymous
  • anonymous
Usually, this means the angle between the two velocity vectors of the two moving objects is zero. This is still pretty ambiguous.
AravindG
  • AravindG
hmm. is there any condition i??like referring to centre of mass and all?

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ash2326
  • ash2326
I suppose not
anonymous
  • anonymous
That is another consideration. Like I said, this is ambiguous. We could define the velocity vectors are being parallel and the center of masses to be co-linear. The line containing both center of masses should also be parallel to the velocities.
AravindG
  • AravindG
|dw:1327850906578:dw| are both a and B head on collision?
ash2326
  • ash2326
http://hyperphysics.phy-astr.gsu.edu/hbase/colsta.html I think so
AravindG
  • AravindG
well i hav a figure can u xplain it ??
anonymous
  • anonymous
They could be depending on the definition. Again, this is ambiguous. We need to first define a head on collision before we can identify one. Typically the "head" of an object is that that is furthest from the center of mass in the direction of the velocity. Think of a nose on an airplane as being the "head."
AravindG
  • AravindG
|dw:1327851112752:dw|
anonymous
  • anonymous
I would say that only B is a "head on" collision.
AravindG
  • AravindG
?are u sure??
AravindG
  • AravindG
can u reason?
AravindG
  • AravindG
look at ash's link
anonymous
  • anonymous
No. Because we haven't adequately defined head on collision! LISTEN!
AravindG
  • AravindG
k
AravindG
  • AravindG
tel
AravindG
  • AravindG
.....
anonymous
  • anonymous
There is no formal definition as far as I can tell. We need to define it here for the context of this problem.
anonymous
  • anonymous
Center of masses - Co-linear. Velocities - parallel, co-linear, line containing center of mass contains vectors defining velocities. We need to decide is the relative velocities matters. That is, for a collision to be head-on, should the objects be travelling towards each other? Can one be at rest? Can they be travelling in the same direction?
AravindG
  • AravindG
ya thats wat i am asking u asking dis to me lol :)
AravindG
  • AravindG
accordind to ur definition if velocities are parallel the bodies wont move towards each other!!
anonymous
  • anonymous
They can be parallel and have opposite signs.
anonymous
  • anonymous
I would not consider two objects travelling in the same direction as being a "head-on" collision. Instead it would be a "head to tail" collision.
asnaseer
  • asnaseer
the meaning of head on collision that I have come across always indicates a collision of two bodies "heading towards one another". i.e. "B" in your diagram above. "A" in your diagram above is usually referred to as a "rear-end collision". But I cannot be certain if these are the "true" definitions of the terms.
AravindG
  • AravindG
k i got it now can u guys xplain to me what is said in that diagram above??it is about a motion of ball bouncing and eventually reaching reat can u say hw we got those eqns like e^2h
AravindG
  • AravindG
srry rest not reat
anonymous
  • anonymous
Please post that question as a separate post, with adequate explanation.
AravindG
  • AravindG
k
anonymous
  • anonymous
As a separate question. Not here.

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