A community for students.

Here's the question you clicked on:

55 members online
  • 0 replying
  • 0 viewing

anonymous

  • 4 years ago

x^2-y^2 = 2*(x-y)^2 What is the ratio of the smaller variable to the larger variable? Please explain.

  • This Question is Closed
  1. phi
    • 4 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 2

    @ven pretty close. @mri can you fix his algebra?

  2. anonymous
    • 4 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    @Phi: Fail from my side think I did a mistake :/

  3. anonymous
    • 4 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    I'll try to fix let me try it before you fix it please.

  4. anonymous
    • 4 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    yes, (x-y)^2 doesnt equal x^2 - y^2

  5. phi
    • 4 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 2

    x^2-y^2 = 2*(x-y)^2 (x-y)(x+y)= 2*(x-y)(x-y) keep going...

  6. anonymous
    • 4 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    Get rid of the (x-y) on both sides to get (x+y)=2(x-y) (x+y)/(x-y)=2/1 Cross multiply? 2x-2y=x+y x = 3y Answer is 1:3?

  7. phi
    • 4 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 2

    ratio of the smaller variable to the larger variable? 1:3 Yes

  8. anonymous
    • 4 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    Awesome. Thanks phi

  9. anonymous
    • 4 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    I got 1:3 as well but how do you understand what is smaller and which is larger phi?

  10. phi
    • 4 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 2

    although when I got to (x+y)=2(x-y) I did: x+y = 2x - 2y 0= x - 3y 3y=x

  11. anonymous
    • 4 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    That wouldve been quicker, but, oh well, at least i got it. @vengeance one of them is larger and one is smaller, not sure if that answers your question. Could you be more clear?

  12. phi
    • 4 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 2

    if we have x = 3y then, to use a concrete example, let y=1 so x=3 ratio of smaller to larger is 1:3 of course, this will work for any y value (except 0)

  13. anonymous
    • 4 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    Ah got it, thank you :)

  14. phi
    • 4 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 2

    I think there is more to this than I thought. We could have y= -1, x= -3 and the ratio of small to large is -3:-1 = 3:1 Is this one of those ambiguous questions?

  15. anonymous
    • 4 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    ambiguous?

  16. anonymous
    • 4 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    I looked it up. Um.. It only had one answer.

  17. anonymous
    • 4 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    Maybe there is a secret rule to ratios that when converting to positive you take the reciprocal. Maybe like when dividing by a negative in inequalities

  18. anonymous
    • 4 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    Try plugging the negative numbers back in to the original equation.

  19. phi
    • 4 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 2

    I just did a quick goole search. It looks like you can take ratios of negatives, but generally it is not done, so I would assume positive numbers unless specifically told otherwise. yes, negative numbers work in your original equation.

  20. anonymous
    • 4 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    Okay, thanks, i gotta go eat dinner

  21. Not the answer you are looking for?
    Search for more explanations.

    • Attachments:

Ask your own question

Sign Up
Find more explanations on OpenStudy
Privacy Policy

Your question is ready. Sign up for free to start getting answers.

spraguer (Moderator)
5 → View Detailed Profile

is replying to Can someone tell me what button the professor is hitting...

23

  • Teamwork 19 Teammate
  • Problem Solving 19 Hero
  • You have blocked this person.
  • ✔ You're a fan Checking fan status...

Thanks for being so helpful in mathematics. If you are getting quality help, make sure you spread the word about OpenStudy.

This is the testimonial you wrote.
You haven't written a testimonial for Owlfred.