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anonymous

  • 4 years ago

FIND AN EQUIVALENT FRACTION 7/12

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  1. anonymous
    • 4 years ago
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    14/24

  2. anonymous
    • 4 years ago
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    49/144 42/72 a bunch of things tak your pick

  3. anonymous
    • 4 years ago
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    do you need an explanation

  4. anonymous
    • 4 years ago
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    YES

  5. anonymous
    • 4 years ago
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    just multiply by 2, 3 , 4

  6. anonymous
    • 4 years ago
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    \[7\pi/12\pi\]

  7. anonymous
    • 4 years ago
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    |dw:1328845904723:dw|

  8. anonymous
    • 4 years ago
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    i'M NOT UNDERSTANDING

  9. anonymous
    • 4 years ago
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    multiply the numerator and denominator by the same number or divide but because you cannot divide you have to multiply you can multiply with any numbers but the easiest is by 2

  10. anonymous
    • 4 years ago
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    Do u understand?

  11. anonymous
    • 4 years ago
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    it's like this man. Say you have 1/2 of a pie. 50% of the pie. Imagine this... 1/2 of a pie. Now, multiply the amount of pies you have by 2. However, don't give yourself two WHOLE pies. You started with 1/2 of a pie. So the next by you give yourself must also only have half of it left. Therefore, you have 2 pies, each with half of them missing. Give yourself another pie if you want... with half of it gone. And another. And another. You'll notice something. Draw this on a sheet of paper if you want, some circles half filled in, however you want to graph it. For every whole circle (1), (1/2) of it is left. Even if you give yourself seemingly more pie (1/2 more), there was still 2 pies, now you have 1/2 + 1/2 1 out of 2 pies, 1/2 again. Make sense? So in a way, you have 2/4 of the total amount of pies. It makes sense if you draw it out (this is a weird way of explaining equivalent fractions lol).

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