Quantcast

Got Homework?

Connect with other students for help. It's a free community.

  • across
    MIT Grad Student
    Online now
  • laura*
    Helped 1,000 students
    Online now
  • Hero
    College Math Guru
    Online now

Here's the question you clicked on:

55 members online
  • 0 replying
  • 0 viewing

chansharp

Consider the circuit shown in the figure below. (Let R1 = 3.00 Ω, R2 = 8.00 Ω, and = 10.0 V.) (a) Find the voltage across R1. (b) Find the current in R1.

  • 2 years ago
  • 2 years ago

  • This Question is Closed
  1. chansharp
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    • 2 years ago
    1 Attachment
  2. Tweedle_Dee
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 2

    There are several ways to solve this problem, but I'm assuming you're doing it without using mesh current or node voltage. You can calculate the voltage between R1 and the 2Ω resistor by simplifying those 4 resistors. The 10Ω || 5Ω = 3.33Ω. 11.33Ω || 3Ω = 2.373Ω. Then calculate the V across R1 with \[ Input V\times \left(Parallel R \div Total R \right)\]\[10V\times\left(2.373\div4.373\right)\] From there it is easy to calculate the current through R1 by ohms law.

    • 2 years ago
  3. estebananaya
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    i think you could first calculate the total resistance: Req = 2+ ((10||5)+R2)||R1) then calculate Iin I = V/Req then calculate the voltage drop on the 2ohm resistance, so the voltage across R1 is V - Iin * 2 = Vr1 and finally by ohm's law: Ir1 = Vr1 / R1

    • 2 years ago
  4. abdulnaz92
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    see thus image

    • 2 years ago
    1 Attachment
  5. gdmellott
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    I like using a spreadsheet. It helps with error checking also. To stimulate some peoples greater interest: When analyzing AC cirduits it generated results that I thought helped me to better tune an equalizer to generate a flatter curve response by assuming that it was a set of parallel filters. The graphing of results of the frequecy amplitudes was of the greatest interest.

    • 2 years ago
  6. Azagen
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    The 5 ohm and 10 ohm resistors are in parallel and can thus be replaced by a single resistor Ra= (1/10 + 1/5 )-1 = 3,33 ohm |dw:1330119198577:dw| Ra and R2 (in series) can be replaced by a single resistor Rb=(3,33+R2) |dw:1330119280784:dw| Then Rb and R1 in parallel is equivalent to a single resistor Rc=(1/Rb + 1/R1)-1 = \[R1(10 +3R2) / (3(R1+R2) +10)\] Now that things have been simplified; the voltage across Rc is the same as that of our combined resistors into Rc (a) V(R1)= Rc*E/(Rc + 2)= \[(R1E(10+3R2))/(16R1+6R2+3R1R2+20)\] Coming back to our initial circuit: The volatge V across R1= R1*I (b) I= V/R1 = [(R1E(10+3R2))/(R1*(16R1+6R2+3R1R2+20))\] Numerical Answer: (a) V= (3*10*(10+3(8))/(16(3)+6(8)+3(3*8)+20) = 5,43 V (b) I= (3*10*(10+3(8))/3((16(3)+6(8)+3(3*8)+20))=1,81 A

    • 2 years ago
  7. gdmellott
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    A free spreadsheet program for Windows is in Open Office org's collection. It does most things quite well. Here is a better file to view for analyzing this circuit.

    • 2 years ago
  8. gdmellott
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    @Azagen You come up with valid answers. Yet your formulas must be coming from a equation calculator, as I can bearly figure our where they might even come from, and in one place you use -1 assumably for inversion or the power of negative 1.

    • 2 years ago
    • Attachments:

See more questions >>>

Your question is ready. Sign up for free to start getting answers.

spraguer (Moderator)
5 → View Detailed Profile

is replying to Can someone tell me what button the professor is hitting...

23

  • Teamwork 19 Teammate
  • Problem Solving 19 Hero
  • You have blocked this person.
  • ✔ You're a fan Checking fan status...

Thanks for being so helpful in mathematics. If you are getting quality help, make sure you spread the word about OpenStudy.

This is the testimonial you wrote.
You haven't written a testimonial for Owlfred.