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abdul_shabeer

  • 4 years ago

Gravel is dropped on a conveyor belt at the rate of 0.5kg/s. The extra force in Newton required to keep the belt moving at 2m/s, is

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  1. Aadarsh
    • 4 years ago
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    Is it 2/0.5?

  2. Aadarsh
    • 4 years ago
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    I am not sure.

  3. abdul_shabeer
    • 4 years ago
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    are you asking 2 or 0.5?

  4. Aadarsh
    • 4 years ago
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    Is it 2 metre/second na?

  5. abdul_shabeer
    • 4 years ago
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    It's one of the option

  6. Aadarsh
    • 4 years ago
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    which one? please do say the options.

  7. abdul_shabeer
    • 4 years ago
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    (a) 1N (b) 2N (c) 4N (d) 0.5 N

  8. Aadarsh
    • 4 years ago
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    I think 2 * 0.5 = 1.

  9. abdul_shabeer
    • 4 years ago
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    Can you explain it?

  10. Aadarsh
    • 4 years ago
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    What I think is the conveyor belt is initially at rest. Gravel mass is 0.5 kg. Now given velocity is 2 m / s. So just multiplied using the force formula.

  11. gogind
    • 4 years ago
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    It is, but you need a reason behind it :D

  12. Aadarsh
    • 4 years ago
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    I request others to check and criticize me if I am wrong.

  13. salini
    • 4 years ago
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    force=momentum*time so momentum is given for unit time (1 second) determine it

  14. Aadarsh
    • 4 years ago
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    So even my answer is correct I believe.

  15. salini
    • 4 years ago
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    the force is nevertheless 0.5N no matter how u speed up

  16. abdul_shabeer
    • 4 years ago
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    Momentum is mass*velocity

  17. Aadarsh
    • 4 years ago
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    But How?

  18. Aadarsh
    • 4 years ago
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    Abdul, What is the correct option given in the key?

  19. abdul_shabeer
    • 4 years ago
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    Key was not given

  20. Aadarsh
    • 4 years ago
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    Oooooooooooooooo

  21. salini
    • 4 years ago
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    sry i dint read the question properly so yes first find momentum and then force

  22. abdul_shabeer
    • 4 years ago
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    This was given in FIITJEE

  23. Aadarsh
    • 4 years ago
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    I could know that. U can even find such questions in BMA workbook.

  24. abdul_shabeer
    • 4 years ago
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    In 8th?

  25. Aadarsh
    • 4 years ago
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    Yeah. Its actually 9th portion. Still u can try.

  26. gogind
    • 4 years ago
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    Write the net force as: \[\ F_{net}= F - F_{thrust} \] it is -F_thurst because the mass in increasing The net force is zero because the system is not increasing or decreasing its velocity, that is the velocity is constant. Now, \[\ F_{thrust}=v\frac{dm}{dt}\] I think it is fairly easy to solve it now :D.

  27. Aadarsh
    • 4 years ago
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    Yeah. so my answer is correct.

  28. abdul_shabeer
    • 4 years ago
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    What is dm/dt?

  29. gogind
    • 4 years ago
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    change in mass per unit time or how much mass is added per second.

  30. Aadarsh
    • 4 years ago
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    Even I will know the use of "d" in formulae in 11th grade. Can anyone explain it in detail?

  31. gogind
    • 4 years ago
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    d is a symbol for a differential. It represents an infitesimal change of some quantity (you will get to that in calculus). It's like \[\ \Delta \] but infinitely small.

  32. Aadarsh
    • 4 years ago
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    So, its a very tough concept. What about Calculus? I just know 2 words - Integration and Differentiation.

  33. gogind
    • 4 years ago
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    Yes that's what you do in Calculus :D. If you are impatient to learn about it I would recommend "Calculus" by Gilbert Strang Link: http://ocw.mit.edu/ans7870/resources/Strang/Edited/Calculus/Calculus.pdf

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