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zehadialam Group Title

How can products and reactants have different amounts of energy without violating the law of conservation of energy?

  • 2 years ago
  • 2 years ago

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  1. Dumb_as_a_Duck Group Title
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    I think so. In a lot of reactions, you find, on the product side, ( some product + 22.4 Kcal or some value like that). Products and reactants can have different amounts of energy, as there will be heat energy released or absorbed (or any other kind of energy) that ultimately help satisfy the law of conversation of energy. But that's just an amateur guess from a fresher.

    • 2 years ago
  2. saratchandra Group Title
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    in a chemical reaction the reaction can take place in any way in reactions the no of moles of reactants are more than that of products and in certain reactions the no of moles of reactants and products are equal

    • 2 years ago
  3. Mani_Jha Group Title
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    Dumb-as_a_duck is right. Chemical reactions take place so that the reactants lose energy and become stable. So, the enthalpy(difference in bond energy between products and reactants) of a favourable reaction is always negative, which means the energy of products is less than that of reactants. Chemical reactions take place through collisions of reactant molecules, and it appears that these collisions are inelastic. So just as a collision in real life(suppose between two big balls) results in loss of energy(which is released as sound, heat etc), molecular collisions also do the same. P.S. It is not so easy to violate the Law of conservation of energy!

    • 2 years ago
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