anonymous
  • anonymous
I am doing self-study on Economics. I realize strong mathematical skill foundation is a must. I don't know where to start with. Can someone help me with the laying out of the courses to prioritize? For example, I don't know what math subjects I should study first before Single Variable Calculus. Thanks.
OCW Scholar - Single Variable Calculus
schrodinger
  • schrodinger
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anonymous
  • anonymous
You need to understand basic algebra and trigonometry from high school, nothing else.
anonymous
  • anonymous
Thanks, that helps. :)
anonymous
  • anonymous
Yes, in calculus, the most obvious economic concept will be the first derivative, which identifies the point where a curved line's slope is zero, or flat. Why is that important? Because in an economics graph, the flattest point of the curved line is its maximum (or minimum). Keep an eye open for regression topics as they appear. Simple algebra is found throughout and drilled into Econ students in lectures, but algebra as found in concepts like the price elasticity of demand is more complex and more important.

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anonymous
  • anonymous
Wow RALPH, thank you. I can't believe people here are going to be this helpful.
anonymous
  • anonymous
http://www.uccs.edu/~math/vidarchive.html Go there and watch math105 (elementary functions for calculus) and do homeworks. Then come here and follow Calculus 1. When finished, grab the book "How to Prove It", read and solve the exercises. When finished, grab the book "Elementary Analysis: The Theory of Calculus" by Kenneth Ross, read and solve the exercises. This will take a while (around a year), then you'll be on the right track.
anonymous
  • anonymous
These are the mathematical skills you are going to need Differentitial Calculus which includes continuity and differentiability and maxima minima integration , area using integration algebra coordinate geometry and trigonometry and statistics

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