Here's the question you clicked on:

55 members online
  • 0 replying
  • 0 viewing

elica85

  • 4 years ago

the electric potential in a region of space is \[V=350/\sqrt{x ^{2}+y ^{2}}\] where x and y are in meters. what is the strength of electric field at (x,y)=(2.6,2.8)m?

  • This Question is Closed
  1. elica85
    • 4 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 1

    E=-dV/ds. gradient V= 350(-1/2)(x^2+y^2)^(-3/2)(2x)+350(-1/2)(x^2+y^2)^(-3/2)(2y). anything wrong so far?

  2. swimermandie
    • 4 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    That kinda how i did it but I keep getting the wrong answer. Let me know if this formula worked for you

  3. elica85
    • 4 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 1

    my answer's not working either =/

  4. TuringTest
    • 4 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 2

    wrong so far is that you have written the gradient as a scalar when it is a vector

  5. TuringTest
    • 4 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 2

    \[\vec E=-\nabla V=<-350x(x^2+y^2)^{-3/2},-350y(x^2+y^2)^{-3/2}>\]now plug in the variables and find the magnitude of the vector

  6. TuringTest
    • 4 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 2

    the magnitude is given by\[\large |E|=\sqrt{E_x^2+E_y^2}\]

  7. elica85
    • 4 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 1

    thank you

  8. TuringTest
    • 4 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 2

    welcome, I hope it works

  9. elica85
    • 4 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 1

    worked!!

  10. TuringTest
    • 4 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 2

    sweet :D

  11. jinjin
    • 4 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    If you cartesian coordiante to spherical coordiante, you will find the answer easier.

  12. elica85
    • 4 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 1

    o yea but how? use r=sqrt(x^2+y^2) and then......? can't believe i can't remember how

  13. Not the answer you are looking for?
    Search for more explanations.

    • Attachments:

Ask your own question

Sign Up
Find more explanations on OpenStudy
Privacy Policy