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CookieMonster101

  • 4 years ago

What is a degree of Polynomial ?

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  1. ncjohnson6943
    • 4 years ago
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    the largest exponent

  2. CookieMonster101
    • 4 years ago
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    could you give me an example ?

  3. mridrik
    • 4 years ago
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    whatever the highest exponent is in a single term of the polynomial, for example, in 3x^2 + 2x + 1, there are 3 terms, 2x^2, 2x, and 1. 2 is the degree because it is the highest exponent. But also when there are multiple exponents in the same term, you must add them together: 2x^2y^3 + 5x

  4. ncjohnson6943
    • 4 years ago
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    2x^3 + 6x^2, the degree would be 3 because the largest exponent is 3

  5. mridrik
    • 4 years ago
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    the degree is 5 because in the same term, there is an exponent of two, and an exponent of 3

  6. mridrik
    • 4 years ago
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    but if we have 3^2x^2 + 5x, the degree is just two because we only use exponents of variables, since 3^2 could just be written as 9

  7. CookieMonster101
    • 4 years ago
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    ohhhh

  8. CookieMonster101
    • 4 years ago
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    Thank- you for explaining ! :)

  9. mridrik
    • 4 years ago
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    sure thing :)

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