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why.math

  • 4 years ago

Choose the point-slope form of the equation below that represents the line that passes through the points (−3, 2) and (2, 1). y + 3 = −5(x − 2) y − 2 = −5(x + 3) y + 3 = −(x − 2) y − 2 = −(x + 3)

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  1. computergeek123
    • 4 years ago
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    The equation is of the form y - y1 = m(x - x1) (x1, y1) is either of the given points; "m" is the slope. Find the slope. m = (y2-y1)/(x2-x1) ....= (1-2)/(2+3) = -1/5 However, this slope is not in any of the options, and I checked my work, so either you mistyped something, maybe one of the points, or the people making the book made a mistake. Plug in either point for y1 and x1 in the equation. Apparently they used (-3, 2). y - 2 = -(1/5)(x - (-3)) y - 2 = -(1/5)(x + 3)

  2. precal
    • 4 years ago
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    |dw:1331070733193:dw|

  3. precal
    • 4 years ago
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    x+5y=7

  4. precal
    • 4 years ago
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    5y=7-x y=(7/5)x-(1/5)

  5. precal
    • 4 years ago
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    Yes, I agree with computergeek. I think you have a typo

  6. why.math
    • 4 years ago
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    idkthats what ive been trying to tell my teachers.. they say the answers there.. but thanks for trying

  7. precal
    • 4 years ago
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    Have your teacher work it out, just make sure you copied it correctly

  8. why.math
    • 4 years ago
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    ok thanks again

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