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Brandie

  • 4 years ago

write in matrix form: x'=y, y'=x+4 my teacher has not gone over this, I need help

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  1. amistre64
    • 4 years ago
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    what is matrix form?

  2. amistre64
    • 4 years ago
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    some sort of subject that this pertains to would help out as well

  3. Brandie
    • 4 years ago
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    I am working with differential equations

  4. amistre64
    • 4 years ago
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    diffy qs, thats a start :)

  5. amistre64
    • 4 years ago
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    and is this the start of a problem or like midways thru?

  6. Brandie
    • 4 years ago
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    does x'=Ax+b help?

  7. Brandie
    • 4 years ago
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    sorry, full question: write each system of differential equations in matrix form, i.e. x'=Ax+b

  8. amistre64
    • 4 years ago
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    let me look that up to see if im familiar with it by another name ...

  9. amistre64
    • 4 years ago
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    this looks useful http://tutorial.math.lamar.edu/Classes/DE/SystemsDE.aspx

  10. Brandie
    • 4 years ago
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    yeah, its actually helping me on other questions, but not this one. But thanks. :)

  11. amistre64
    • 4 years ago
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    is your vector [x',y'] by chance?

  12. Brandie
    • 4 years ago
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    idk, a vector was not mentioned

  13. amistre64
    • 4 years ago
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    x'=0x+y+0 y'=x+0y+4 \[\binom{x'}{y'}=\begin{pmatrix}0&1&0\\1&0&4 \end{pmatrix}\binom{x}{y}\] maybe

  14. amistre64
    • 4 years ago
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    matrixes are vectors ...

  15. amistre64
    • 4 years ago
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    \[\binom{x'}{y'}=\begin{pmatrix}0&1\\1&0 \end{pmatrix}\binom{x}{y}+\binom{0}{4}\] maybe

  16. Mr.Math
    • 4 years ago
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    We have the system \(x'=0x+y \) \(y'=x+0y+4\). We can write this as: \({x' \choose y'}=\left[\begin{matrix}0 & 1 \\ 1 & 0\end{matrix}\right]{x\choose y}+{0\choose 4}.\)

  17. amistre64
    • 4 years ago
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    yay!! thats good enough for validation to me :)

  18. Brandie
    • 4 years ago
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    really? i thought it was more involved than that, cool. Thanks guys!

  19. Mr.Math
    • 4 years ago
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    Although I think it can be solved without finding any eigenvalues or eigenvectors.

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