anonymous
  • anonymous
In a transformer, the power is a constant either ends. Why?
Physics
  • Stacey Warren - Expert brainly.com
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jamiebookeater
  • jamiebookeater
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radar
  • radar
If it is a voltage step-up there is a corresponding step-down of current so the product is very close to being the same. There will be some loss as a transformer is not 100% efficient. If it is a step-down voltage there will be a step-up with regard to current and remember, it is the product of voltage and current that equals power.
anonymous
  • anonymous
But why is there a corresponding step-down of current?
radar
  • radar
for the conservation of energy. If it was the other way around, the transformer would become a generator, you could sell the produced power and make a million.

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radar
  • radar
Power in will be equal to or a little less than power out. That is why.
anonymous
  • anonymous
So could you say that the resistance of the secondary coil in/decreases to match the change of voltage/current?
radar
  • radar
I wouldn't say it that way. You realize of course the actual current will depend on the load connected to the secondary, and the capacity of the source power.
radar
  • radar
What kind of statement are you required to make?
radar
  • radar
What you did say might be appropriate if you used the term impedance. A transformer will transform current, voltage, and impedance.
radar
  • radar
all at the same time! lol.
anonymous
  • anonymous
Thanks, that’s exactly the kind of thing I was looking for.
anonymous
  • anonymous
So it's essentially 'AC resistance' to put it crudely?
radar
  • radar
1:2 transformer will double the voltage, halve the current and present an impedand of 1:4 (I think it is the square of the turns ratio) (my memory is not the best lol)
radar
  • radar
I believe you have come to terms with an explanation that suits you and explains it for you. Good luck in your studies.

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