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MonicaMorris Group Title

1.B 2.C 3.B 4.C 5.A 6.B 7.C 8.C 9.B 10.D 11.C 14.C

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  1. MonicaMorris Group Title
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  2. mrjosezero Group Title
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    something wrong with my computer. it won't open the attachments

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  3. MonicaMorris Group Title
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    Ok do you want me to cut and paste it then?

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  4. mrjosezero Group Title
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    yes

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  5. MonicaMorris Group Title
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    1. What is the event(what is happening) of the Cyclopes excerpt from the epic poem "The Odyssey"? (6 points) The men are in a land of tiny creatures who capture and torture them. The men are in a land of giants; one captures them and they escape. The men are taking a pleasure cruise on a ship. 2. This poem is written using which of the following poetic forms? (6 points) couplet oxymoron rhyme couplet and rhyme 3. Who is the speakerof this poem? (6 points) We do not know. Odysseus (Ulysses) an old sailor Homer (the author) 4. The line "The piece I gave amongst my soldiers" (line 451) shows the view of (6 points) the crew the Cyclops. Odysseus (Ulysses). the giants. 5. According to the poem, what nouns help Odysseus and his men escape? (6 points) olive tree branch, wine, sheep rocks, dunghills nectar, ambrosia wine, the gods' wrath 6. When Odysseus offers the Cyclops a gift of wine so that he can catch the giant off guard and escape; this "gift" is an example of (6 points) hospitality. irony. respect. good will. 7. When Odysseus brags at the end of the poem that he is the one who defeated the Cyclops, it shows his quality of (6 points) anger. respect. pride. faith. 8. Why do the other Cyclopes not help their brother when he loses his eye and screams out in pain? (6 points) He tells them to leave, and they always do what he says. He screams so loudly they are afraid. He says, "No-Man" hurt him, so they think that he is not harmed and leave. They couldn't hear him because they had cotton in their ears. 9. Who did Odysseus defeat (use a dictionary to answer this one) in this chapter of the story? (6 points) Jove Polyphemus Calypso Ithaca 10. In what way does Odysseus, along with his men, almost end up back on the island after their escape? (6 points) Giants catch them in the water. The blinded giant throws a huge rock. A crew member falls overboard. An earthquake causes a tidal wave. 11. To what does the "unsightly blemish" (line 674) refer? (6 points) the race of Cyclopes the crew who gets eaten alive the blinded giant's eye the destroyed ship 12. Lines 439, 642, and 675 all have examples of which poetic device? (6 points) simile metaphor allusion stanza 13. Lines 548, 574, and 593 all have examples of which poetic device? (6 points) simile oxymoron metaphor alliteration 14. How do Odysseus and his men actually escape from the Cyclop's cave? (6 points) riding the backs of sheep crawling on all fours beside sheep hanging under sheep bellies none of the above 15. Why are the sheep, along with the Cyclops, in great pain (although for different reasons) that morning? (6 points) They feel what the giant feels. He can't let them out of the cave. It is time for them to be milked. Odysseus's men blinded them all. 16. Respond in at least TWO SENTENCES to ONE of the following questions. BE SURE TO TELL ME WHICH QUESTION YOU ARE ANSWERING.A. In what way does the epic excerpt about the Cyclops and Odysseus express a form of X-Ray vision? B. Compare Odysseus' trait of pride to that of another person's pride, be it a fictional character or real-life person. (10 points)

    • 2 years ago
  6. MonicaMorris Group Title
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    With storms of whistlings then his flock he drave 435 Up to the mountains; and occasion gave For me to use my wits, which to their height I strived to screw up, that a vengeance might By some means fall from thence, and Pallas now Afford a full ear to my neediest vow. 440 This then my thoughts preferr'd: A huge club lay Close by his milk-house, which was now in way To dry and season, being an olive-tree Which late he fell'd, and, being green, must be Made lighter for his manage. 'Twas so vast, 445 That we resembled it to some fit mast, To serve a ship of burthen that was driven With twenty oars, and had a bigness given To bear a huge sea. Full so thick, so tall, We judg'd this club; which I, in part, hew'd small, 450 And cut a fathom off. The piece I gave Amongst my soldiers, to take down, and shave; Which done, I sharpen'd it at top, and then, Harden'd in fire, I hid it in the den Within a nasty dunghill reeking there, 455 Thick, and so moist it issued everywhere. Then made I lots cast by my friends to try Whose fortune served to dare the bored out eye Of that man-eater; and the lot did fall On four I wish'd to make my aid of all, 460 And I the fifth made, chosen like the rest. Then came the even, and he came from the feast Of his fat cattle, drave in all, nor kept One male abroad; if, or his memory slept By God's direct will, or of purpose was 465 His driving in of all then, doth surpass My comprehension. But he closed again The mighty bar, milk'd, and did still maintain All other observation as before. His work all done, two of my soldiers more 470 At once he snatch'd up, and to supper went. Then dared I words to him, and did present A bowl of wine, with these words: 'Cyclop! take A bowl of wine, from my hand, that may make Way for the man's flesh thou hast eat, and show 475 What drink our ship held; which in sacred vow I offer to thee to take pity on me On my way home. Thy rages be Now no more sufferable. How shall men, Mad and inhuman that thou art, again 480 Greet thy abode, and get thy actions grace, If thus thou ragest, and eat'st up their race.' He took, and drunk, and vehemently joy'd To taste the sweet cup; and again employ'd My flagon's powers, entreating more, and said: 485 'Good guest, again afford my taste thy aid, And let me know thy name, and quickly now, That in thy recompense I may bestow A hospitable gift on thy desert, And such a one as shall rejoice thy heart. 490 For to the Cyclops too the gentle earth Bears generous wine, and Jove augments her birth, In store of such, with showers; but this rich wine Fell from the river, that is mere divine, Of nectar and ambrosia.' This again 495 I gave him, and again; nor could the fool abstain, But drunk as often. When the noble juice Had wrought upon his spirit, I then gave use To fairer language, saying: 'Cyclop! now, As thou demand'st, I'll tell thee my name, do thou 500 Make good thy hospitable gift to me. My name is No-Man; No-Man each degree Of friends, as well as parents, call my name.' He answer'd, as his cruel soul became: 'No-Man! I'll eat thee last of all thy friends; 505 And this is that in which so much amends I vow'd to thy deservings, thus shall be My hospitable gift made good to thee.' This said, he upwards fell, but then bent round His fleshy neck; and Sleep, with all crowns crown'd, 510 Subdued the savage. From his throat brake out My wine, with man's flesh gobbets, like a spout, When, loaded with his cups, he lay and snored; And then took I the club's end up, and gored The burning coal-heap, that the point might heat; 515 Confirm'd my fellow's minds, lest Fear should let Their vow'd assay, and make them fly my aid. Straight was the olive-lever, I had laid Amidst the huge fire to get hardening, hot, And glow'd extremely, though 'twas green; which got 520 From forth the cinders, close about me stood My hardy friends; but that which did the good Was God's good inspiration, that gave A spirit beyond the spirit they used to have; Who took the olive spar, made keen before, 525 And plunged it in his eye, and up I bore, Bent to the top close, and help'd pour it in, With all my forces. And as you have seen A ship-wright bore a naval beam, he oft Thrusts at the auger's froofe, works still aloft, 530 And at the shank help others, with a cord Wound round about to make it sooner bored, All plying the round still; so into his eye The fiery stake we labour'd to imply. Out gush'd the blood that scalded, his eye-ball 535 Thrust out a flaming vapour, that scorch'd all His brows and eye-lids, his eye-strings did crack, As in the sharp and burning rafter brake. And as a smith to harden any tool, Broad axe, or mattock, in his trough doth cool 540 The red-hot substance, that so fervent is It makes the cold wave straight to seethe and hiss; So sod and hiss'd his eye about the stake. He roar'd withal, and all his cavern brake In claps like thunder. We did frighted fly, 545 Dispers'd in corners. He from forth his eye The fixed stake pluck'd; after which the blood Flow'd freshly forth; and, mad, he hurl'd the wood About his hovel. Out he then did cry For other Cyclops, that in caverns by 550 Upon a windy promontory dwell'd; Who, hearing how impetuously he yell'd, Rush'd every way about him, and inquired, What ill afflicted him, that he expired Such horrid clamours, and in sacred Night 555 To break their sleeps so? Ask'd him, if his fright Came from some mortal that his flocks had driven? Or if by craft, or might, his death were given? He answer'd from his den: 'By craft, nor might, No-Man hath given me death.' They then said right, 560 If no man hurt thee, and thyself alone, That which is done to thee by Jove is done; And what great Jove inflicts no man can fly. Pray to thy Father yet, a Deity, And prove, from him if thou canst help acquire.' 565 Thus spake they, leaving him; when all on fire My heart with joy was, that so well my wit And name deceived him; whom now pain did split, And groaning up and down he groping tried To find the stone, which found, he put aside; 570 But in the door sat, feeling if he could (As his sheep issued) on some man lay hold; Esteeming me a fool, that could devise No stratagem to 'scape his gross surprise. But I, contending what I could invent 575 My friends and me from death so eminent To get deliver'd, all my wiles I wove (Life being the subject) and did this approve: Fat fleecy rams, most fair, and great, lay there, That did a burden like a violet bear. 580 These, while this learn'd-in-villany did sleep, I yoked with osiers cut there, sheep to sheep, Three in a rank, and still the mid sheep bore A man about his belly, the two more March'd on his each side for defense. I then, 585 Choosing myself the fairest of the den, His fleecy belly under-crept, embrac'd His back, and in his rich wool wrapt me fast With both my hands, arm'd with as fast a mind. And thus each man hung, till the morning shin'd; 590 Which come, he knew the hour, and let abroad His male-flocks first, the females unmilk'd stood Bleating and braying, their full bags so sore With being unemptied, but their shepherd more With being unsighted; which was cause his mind 595 Went not a milking. He, to wreak inclin'd, The backs felt, as they pass'd, of those male dams, Gross fool! believing, we would ride his rams! Nor ever knew that any of them bore Upon his belly any man before. 600 The last ram came to pass him, with his wool And me together loaded to the full, For there did I hang; and that ram he stay'd, And me withal had in his hands, my head Troubled the while, not causelessly, nor least. 605 This ram he groped, and talk'd to: 'Lazy beast! Why last art thou now? Thou hast never used To lag thus hindmost, but still first hast bruised The tender blossom of a flower, and held State in thy steps, both to the flood and field, 610 First still at fold at even, now last remain? Dost thou not wish I had mine eye again, Which that abhorr'd man No-Man did put out, Assisted by his execrable rout, When he had wrought me down with wine? But he 615 Must not escape my wreak so cunningly. I would to heaven thou knew'st, and could but speak, To tell me where he lurks now! I would break His brain about my cave, strew'd here and there, To ease my heart of those foul ills, that were 620 Th' inflictions of a man I prized at nought.' Thus let he him abroad; when I, once brought A little from his hold, myself first losed, And next my friends. Then drave we, and disposed, His straight-legg'd fat fleece-bearers over land, 625 Even till they all were in my ship's command; And to our loved friends show'd our pray'd-for sight, Escaped from death. But, for our loss outright They brake in tears; which with a look I stay'd, And bade them take our boot in. They obey'd, 630 And up we all went, sat, and used our oars. But having left as far the savage shores As one might hear a voice, we then might see The Cyclop at the haven; when instantly I stay'd our oars, and this insultance used: 635 'Cyclop! thou shouldst not have so much abused Thy monstrous forces, to oppose their least Against a man immartial, and a guest, And eat his fellows. Thou mightst know there were Some ills behind, rude swain, for thee to bear, 640 That fear'd not to devour thy guests, and break All laws of humans. Jove sends therefore wreak, And all the Gods, by me.' This blew the more His burning fury; when the top he tore From off a huge rock, and so right a throw 645 Made at our ship, that just before the prow It overflew and fell, miss'd mast and all Exceeding little; but about the fall So fierce a wave it raised, that back it bore Our ship so far, it almost touch'd the shore. 650 A bead-hook then, a far-extended one, I snatch'd up, thrust hard, and so set us gone Some little way; and straight commanded all To help me with their oars, on pain to fall Again on our confusion. But a sign 655 I with my head made, and their oars were mine In all performance. When we off were set, (Then first, twice further) my heart was so great, It would again provoke him, but my men On all sides rush'd about me, to contain, 660 And said: 'Unhappy! why will you provoke A man so rude, that with so dead a stroke, Given with his rock-dart, made the sea thrust back Our ship so far, and near hand forced our wrack? Should he again but hear your voice resound, 665 And any word reach, thereby would be found His dart's direction, which would, in his fall, Crush piece-meal us, quite split our ship and all; So much dart wields the monster.' Thus urged they Impossible things, in fear; but I gave way 670 To that wrath which so long I held depress'd, By great necessity conquer'd, in my breast: 'Cyclop! if any ask thee, who imposed Th' unsightly blemish that thine eye enclosed, Say that Ulysses, old Laertes' son, 675 Whose seat is Ithaca, and who hath won Surname of city-racer, bored it out.' With storms of whistlings then his flock he drave 435 Up to the mountains; and occasion gave For me to use my wits, which to their height I strived to screw up, that a vengeance might By some means fall from thence, and Pallas now Afford a full ear to my neediest vow. 440 This then my thoughts preferr'd: A huge club lay Close by his milk-house, which was now in way To dry and season, being an olive-tree Which late he fell'd, and, being green, must be Made lighter for his manage. 'Twas so vast, 445 That we resembled it to some fit mast, To serve a ship of burthen that was driven With twenty oars, and had a bigness given To bear a huge sea. Full so thick, so tall, We judg'd this club; which I, in part, hew'd small, 450 And cut a fathom off. The piece I gave Amongst my soldiers, to take down, and shave; Which done, I sharpen'd it at top, and then, Harden'd in fire, I hid it in the den Within a nasty dunghill reeking there, 455 Thick, and so moist it issued everywhere. Then made I lots cast by my friends to try Whose fortune served to dare the bored out eye Of that man-eater; and the lot did fall On four I wish'd to make my aid of all, 460 And I the fifth made, chosen like the rest. Then came the even, and he came from the feast Of his fat cattle, drave in all, nor kept One male abroad; if, or his memory slept By God's direct will, or of purpose was 465 His driving in of all then, doth surpass My comprehension. But he closed again The mighty bar, milk'd, and did still maintain All other observation as before. His work all done, two of my soldiers more 470 At once he snatch'd up, and to supper went. Then dared I words to him, and did present A bowl of wine, with these words: 'Cyclop! take A bowl of wine, from my hand, that may make Way for the man's flesh thou hast eat, and show 475 What drink our ship held; which in sacred vow I offer to thee to take pity on me On my way home. Thy rages be Now no more sufferable. How shall men, Mad and inhuman that thou art, again 480 Greet thy abode, and get thy actions grace, If thus thou ragest, and eat'st up their race.' He took, and drunk, and vehemently joy'd To taste the sweet cup; and again employ'd My flagon's powers, entreating more, and said: 485 'Good guest, again afford my taste thy aid, And let me know thy name, and quickly now, That in thy recompense I may bestow A hospitable gift on thy desert, And such a one as shall rejoice thy heart. 490 For to the Cyclops too the gentle earth Bears generous wine, and Jove augments her birth, In store of such, with showers; but this rich wine Fell from the river, that is mere divine, Of nectar and ambrosia.' This again 495 I gave him, and again; nor could the fool abstain, But drunk as often. When the noble juice Had wrought upon his spirit, I then gave use To fairer language, saying: 'Cyclop! now, As thou demand'st, I'll tell thee my name, do thou 500 Make good thy hospitable gift to me. My name is No-Man; No-Man each degree Of friends, as well as parents, call my name.' He answer'd, as his cruel soul became: 'No-Man! I'll eat thee last of all thy friends; 505 And this is that in which so much amends I vow'd to thy deservings, thus shall be My hospitable gift made good to thee.' This said, he upwards fell, but then bent round His fleshy neck; and Sleep, with all crowns crown'd, 510 Subdued the savage. From his throat brake out My wine, with man's flesh gobbets, like a spout, When, loaded with his cups, he lay and snored; And then took I the club's end up, and gored The burning coal-heap, that the point might heat; 515 Confirm'd my fellow's minds, lest Fear should let Their vow'd assay, and make them fly my aid. Straight was the olive-lever, I had laid Amidst the huge fire to get hardening, hot, And glow'd extremely, though 'twas green; which got 520 From forth the cinders, close about me stood My hardy friends; but that which did the good Was God's good inspiration, that gave A spirit beyond the spirit they used to have; Who took the olive spar, made keen before, 525 And plunged it in his eye, and up I bore, Bent to the top close, and help'd pour it in, With all my forces. And as you have seen A ship-wright bore a naval beam, he oft Thrusts at the auger's froofe, works still aloft, 530 And at the shank help others, with a cord Wound round about to make it sooner bored, All plying the round still; so into his eye The fiery stake we labour'd to imply. Out gush'd the blood that scalded, his eye-ball 535 Thrust out a flaming vapour, that scorch'd all His brows and eye-lids, his eye-strings did crack, As in the sharp and burning rafter brake. And as a smith to harden any tool, Broad axe, or mattock, in his trough doth cool 540 The red-hot substance, that so fervent is It makes the cold wave straight to seethe and hiss; So sod and hiss'd his eye about the stake. He roar'd withal, and all his cavern brake In claps like thunder. We did frighted fly, 545 Dispers'd in corners. He from forth his eye The fixed stake pluck'd; after which the blood Flow'd freshly forth; and, mad, he hurl'd the wood About his hovel. Out he then did cry For other Cyclops, that in caverns by 550 Upon a windy promontory dwell'd; Who, hearing how impetuously he yell'd, Rush'd every way about him, and inquired, What ill afflicted him, that he expired Such horrid clamours, and in sacred Night 555 To break their sleeps so? Ask'd him, if his fright Came from some mortal that his flocks had driven? Or if by craft, or might, his death were given? He answer'd from his den: 'By craft, nor might, No-Man hath given me death.' They then said right, 560 If no man hurt thee, and thyself alone, That which is done to thee by Jove is done; And what great Jove inflicts no man can fly. Pray to thy Father yet, a Deity, And prove, from him if thou canst help acquire.' 565 Thus spake they, leaving him; when all on fire My heart with joy was, that so well my wit And name deceived him; whom now pain did split, And groaning up and down he groping tried To find the stone, which found, he put aside; 570 But in the door sat, feeling if he could (As his sheep issued) on some man lay hold; Esteeming me a fool, that could devise No stratagem to 'scape his gross surprise. But I, contending what I could invent 575 My friends and me from death so eminent To get deliver'd, all my wiles I wove (Life being the subject) and did this approve: Fat fleecy rams, most fair, and great, lay there, That did a burden like a violet bear. 580 These, while this learn'd-in-villany did sleep, I yoked with osiers cut there, sheep to sheep, Three in a rank, and still the mid sheep bore A man about his belly, the two more March'd on his each side for defense. I then, 585 Choosing myself the fairest of the den, His fleecy belly under-crept, embrac'd His back, and in his rich wool wrapt me fast With both my hands, arm'd with as fast a mind. And thus each man hung, till the morning shin'd; 590 Which come, he knew the hour, and let abroad His male-flocks first, the females unmilk'd stood Bleating and braying, their full bags so sore With being unemptied, but their shepherd more With being unsighted; which was cause his mind 595 Went not a milking. He, to wreak inclin'd, The backs felt, as they pass'd, of those male dams, Gross fool! believing, we would ride his rams! Nor ever knew that any of them bore Upon his belly any man before. 600 The last ram came to pass him, with his wool And me together loaded to the full, For there did I hang; and that ram he stay'd, And me withal had in his hands, my head Troubled the while, not causelessly, nor least. 605 This ram he groped, and talk'd to: 'Lazy beast! Why last art thou now? Thou hast never used To lag thus hindmost, but still first hast bruised The tender blossom of a flower, and held State in thy steps, both to the flood and field, 610 First still at fold at even, now last remain? Dost thou not wish I had mine eye again, Which that abhorr'd man No-Man did put out, Assisted by his execrable rout, When he had wrought me down with wine? But he 615 Must not escape my wreak so cunningly. I would to heaven thou knew'st, and could but speak, To tell me where he lurks now! I would break His brain about my cave, strew'd here and there, To ease my heart of those foul ills, that were 620 Th' inflictions of a man I prized at nought.' Thus let he him abroad; when I, once brought A little from his hold, myself first losed, And next my friends. Then drave we, and disposed, His straight-legg'd fat fleece-bearers over land, 625 Even till they all were in my ship's command; And to our loved friends show'd our pray'd-for sight, Escaped from death. But, for our loss outright They brake in tears; which with a look I stay'd, And bade them take our boot in. They obey'd, 630 And up we all went, sat, and used our oars. But having left as far the savage shores As one might hear a voice, we then might see The Cyclop at the haven; when instantly I stay'd our oars, and this insultance used: 635 'Cyclop! thou shouldst not have so much abused Thy monstrous forces, to oppose their least Against a man immartial, and a guest, And eat his fellows. Thou mightst know there were Some ills behind, rude swain, for thee to bear, 640 That fear'd not to devour thy guests, and break All laws of humans. Jove sends therefore wreak, And all the Gods, by me.' This blew the more His burning fury; when the top he tore From off a huge rock, and so right a throw 645 Made at our ship, that just before the prow It overflew and fell, miss'd mast and all Exceeding little; but about the fall So fierce a wave it raised, that back it bore Our ship so far, it almost touch'd the shore. 650 A bead-hook then, a far-extended one, I snatch'd up, thrust hard, and so set us gone Some little way; and straight commanded all To help me with their oars, on pain to fall Again on our confusion. But a sign 655 I with my head made, and their oars were mine In all performance. When we off were set, (Then first, twice further) my heart was so great, It would again provoke him, but my men On all sides rush'd about me, to contain, 660 And said: 'Unhappy! why will you provoke A man so rude, that with so dead a stroke, Given with his rock-dart, made the sea thrust back Our ship so far, and near hand forced our wrack? Should he again but hear your voice resound, 665 And any word reach, thereby would be found His dart's direction, which would, in his fall, Crush piece-meal us, quite split our ship and all; So much dart wields the monster.' Thus urged they Impossible things, in fear; but I gave way 670 To that wrath which so long I held depress'd, By great necessity conquer'd, in my breast: 'Cyclop! if any ask thee, who imposed Th' unsightly blemish that thine eye enclosed, Say that Ulysses, old Laertes' son, 675 Whose seat is Ithaca, and who hath won Surname of city-racer, bored it out.'

    • 2 years ago
  7. MonicaMorris Group Title
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    This is the right one.

    • 2 years ago
  8. mrjosezero Group Title
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    1. The men are in a land of giants; one captures them and they escape.

    • 2 years ago
  9. MonicaMorris Group Title
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    Ok care to explain why you don't have to if you don't want to.

    • 2 years ago
  10. mrjosezero Group Title
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    i read this story before and i know that In The Odyssey by Homer: he Land his ships in Sicily, Odysseus and twelve of his men went in search of supplies. They come across a cave that was obviously inhabited by a giant. Odysseus insisted on meeting the inhabitant in the hope of exchanging gifts. Polyphemus, a Cyclops and son of Poseidon, drove his giant herd of sheep into the cave and blocked the huge cave with a huge boulder.Finding intruders in the cave, he immediately killed and ate two of Odysseus' men. Knowing he would never be able to leave the cave unless they killed the Cyclops

    • 2 years ago
  11. MonicaMorris Group Title
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    Right.

    • 2 years ago
  12. MonicaMorris Group Title
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    Are you a fan of this guy? I think he writes to long instead of getting right to the point.

    • 2 years ago
  13. mrjosezero Group Title
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    am not a fan of this guy but i agree with you

    • 2 years ago
  14. MonicaMorris Group Title
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    Gosh did you know I had to do four test like this today and I cannot take it anymore. If I have to do one more like this I'm going to peel of my own.

    • 2 years ago
  15. MonicaMorris Group Title
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    skin.

    • 2 years ago
  16. mrjosezero Group Title
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    four test on the same day wow

    • 2 years ago
  17. MonicaMorris Group Title
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    Yup. Thats why I'm hoping you can help me with this one.

    • 2 years ago
  18. mrjosezero Group Title
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    i got two essays to do which is due tomorrow.

    • 2 years ago
  19. MonicaMorris Group Title
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    Shut up me too!!!

    • 2 years ago
  20. mrjosezero Group Title
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    it's for my literature class.

    • 2 years ago
  21. MonicaMorris Group Title
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    Mine too. I can help you after you finish helping me I'm really good in english. I have an A+.

    • 2 years ago
  22. mrjosezero Group Title
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    I have an A also.

    • 2 years ago
  23. MonicaMorris Group Title
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    Cool are you homeschooled too?

    • 2 years ago
  24. mrjosezero Group Title
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    no am not homeschooled.

    • 2 years ago
  25. MonicaMorris Group Title
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    Oh. Anyway lets continue. You should try homeschooling its like a vacation everyday.

    • 2 years ago
  26. mrjosezero Group Title
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    why don't you go to school

    • 2 years ago
  27. MonicaMorris Group Title
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    Its way more fun. I can wake up whatever time I want and do my work whenever I want.

    • 2 years ago
  28. mrjosezero Group Title
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    that's cool

    • 2 years ago
  29. MonicaMorris Group Title
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    I know right!!!!! Are my answers right so far?

    • 2 years ago
  30. mrjosezero Group Title
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    so far yea

    • 2 years ago
  31. mrjosezero Group Title
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    i have to go to finish my homework. Nice meeting you Monica

    • 2 years ago
  32. MonicaMorris Group Title
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    You too.

    • 2 years ago
  33. babyosa Group Title
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    In that poem what are the poetic devices in lines 439,642 and 675 and also in 548, 574, and 593

    • 2 years ago
  34. CaritaDeAngel Group Title
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    @ MinicaMorris , Do You Go To This School Called , " Connections Academy " ?

    • one year ago
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