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IsTim

  • 4 years ago

If every electron must have a unique set of 4 quantum numbers, how many different electrons (Sets of 4 quantum numbers) can there be for each principal quantum number from n=1 to n=3?

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  1. Rogue
    • 4 years ago
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    Well, for n =1, there can only be 2 electrons, so 2 sets of unique quantum #s. For n = 2, there can be 8 electrons, so 8 sets unique of quantum #s. For n = 3, there are 18 electrons and so 18 sets...

  2. IsTim
    • 4 years ago
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    Here' my answer and the reasoning behind it: For each principal quantum number from n=1 to n=3, there must be 12 electrons. I got this answer by counting spin quantum # in Tbl. 4, a summary of quantum numbers.

  3. IsTim
    • 4 years ago
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    How did yo uget your answer???

  4. IsTim
    • 4 years ago
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    I'm good then. Thanks.

  5. Mani_Jha
    • 4 years ago
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    For n=1, there is only one s-orbital, which can accomodate only two electrons. For n=2, you'll get s and p(6 elecrtons) orbitals both. And for n=3, you get s and p and d orbitals(10). The no. of electrons cannot be same in all the shells. Rogue is right.

  6. Rogue
    • 4 years ago
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    Hmm, my explanation wasn't posted either... 4th time today! Not fun retyping... Mani's answer is pretty good :)

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