anonymous
  • anonymous
i am planning on majoring in engineering, but recently i have been told by a clinical psychologist that i have a math learning disability. should i change my major?
MIT 18.06 Linear Algebra, Spring 2010
  • Stacey Warren - Expert brainly.com
Hey! We 've verified this expert answer for you, click below to unlock the details :)
SOLVED
At vero eos et accusamus et iusto odio dignissimos ducimus qui blanditiis praesentium voluptatum deleniti atque corrupti quos dolores et quas molestias excepturi sint occaecati cupiditate non provident, similique sunt in culpa qui officia deserunt mollitia animi, id est laborum et dolorum fuga. Et harum quidem rerum facilis est et expedita distinctio. Nam libero tempore, cum soluta nobis est eligendi optio cumque nihil impedit quo minus id quod maxime placeat facere possimus, omnis voluptas assumenda est, omnis dolor repellendus. Itaque earum rerum hic tenetur a sapiente delectus, ut aut reiciendis voluptatibus maiores alias consequatur aut perferendis doloribus asperiores repellat.
schrodinger
  • schrodinger
I got my questions answered at brainly.com in under 10 minutes. Go to brainly.com now for free help!
anonymous
  • anonymous
I know sometimes, I feel the same way, that I can't learn math, but that's why you're here right? The other website that I would recommend cramster.
anonymous
  • anonymous
I was in same situation and got a bunch of "One Brain" sessions and I went from fail to top on the class in "Heat and Fluids".... chk em out... http://www.3in1concepts.us/
anonymous
  • anonymous
It actually depends on what kind of math learning disability you have. I have dyslexia which causes me to flip signs, inequality symbols, copy wrongly and the like. In the case of LA, Gaussian elimination or matrix multiplication is impossible. Or rather has about 30% chance of failure on a 4 by 4 matrix. Also my memory is pretty much abysmal (anything i remember by rote has a chance of sign, order or something being flipped around). But this doesn't hinder me in in any way, mainly because i'm a com-sci person. As long as i can understand the theory, even if i can't actually carry out simple computations(they claim its simple), i can implement them happily. Of course my exams suffer, but my work doesn't (it just takes longer if i need to triple check a calculation, or ensure its entered correctly into a computer). If you are doing engineering and have roughly the same issues as me, you probably will suffer for the engineering math modules. Most of them emphasize fast calculations from memory. As long as you understand the theory you should still be able to get along. Think about it. If you have a "math learning disability" and that stops you completely from doing math, you will miss out all sciences, all engineering, computing disciplines and some amount of the social science. That will leave you with pure arts like literature, something i doubt you would want from the fact you're here. If you like what you are doing, stick with it.

Looking for something else?

Not the answer you are looking for? Search for more explanations.