anonymous
  • anonymous
What are the physiological consequences of removal, damage or deficiency of components of the mitochondria?
Biology
  • Stacey Warren - Expert brainly.com
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schrodinger
  • schrodinger
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blues
  • blues
The actual molecular effect depends on which specific component were removed. Defects in the electron transport chain would prevent the mitochondria from building up a strong proton gradient whereas defects in ATP synthase would result in an inappropriately strong proton gradient. At the cellular level, the result would be the same: decreased ATP production, decreased ATP level, and decreases in all cellular processes which require the energy stored in ATP (which is pretty much all of them). That's why you don't see many mitochondrial deficiency illnesses: the far reaching effects of even small defects in function tend to be lethal.
anonymous
  • anonymous
Would you agree that the mitochondria could be restored by fusion from healthy neighboring mitochondria? I think severe damage would impair this aspect, although it should stop or delay apoptosis, right?
blues
  • blues
I have never heard of repair through mitochondrial fusing. But just because I haven't heard of it doesn't mean it doesn't exist. If mitochondria could fuse, it would depend on what the nature and severity of problem was with the damaged one. The damaged components would still be damaged but if they retained partial function, the healthy one would restore some functionality to the entire unit. Still, I have never heard of that happening.

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anonymous
  • anonymous
Fair enough. I thought I had read that it was possible for mito fusion, but I could be wrong. Having said all that, would the same be true for mitchondrial damage in Chloroplasts? I would think that there would be some differences?
blues
  • blues
Plants are not my strong suite but in general I'd say the effects of disrupting electron transport and disrupting ATP synthase would be the same. I will certainly look up mitochondrial fusion and get back to you.
anonymous
  • anonymous
Thanks Blues. I appreciate your comments. Your responses make me think and want to learn more as I go through this gauntlet of Bio, AP 1 and 2 and Micro...
anonymous
  • anonymous
According to this study there is signs that Mitochdonrial fusion prevents mutations and defects, aswell as Mitochondria that has a low prevelence of fusion is more prominent to develop mutations and defects. Review of study: http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2010/04/100415125942.htm Auctal study: http://www.cell.com/retrieve/pii/S0092867410001790
anonymous
  • anonymous
I would assume the damaged Mitochondria would be subjugated to Apoptos stimuli rather than fusion inorder to prevent a much larger scale problem in your body.
blues
  • blues
@exuras, The expert has spoken. ; D Apoptosis was my immediate reaction to mitochondrial damage too. But it's never that simple in biology. Thanks for the links - I will certainly check them out.
anonymous
  • anonymous
Me too... Thanks Exuras!! Do you have any input on the Chloroplasts mitochondrial damage scenario?
anonymous
  • anonymous
You flatter me Blues, i just happend to view that review a couple of weeks ago by chance and this question sparked a memory. Im sorry Pooldaddy i usually don't dare to answer questions outside of the Human body, i have very little knowlegde of botany.
anonymous
  • anonymous
No worries. Thanks to both of you.... Blues, let me know if you come up with anything on the Chloro scenario. Thanks again.
blues
  • blues
I will, but like exuras I came up in human physiology and it feels somewhat irresponsible to talk about plants.

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