anonymous
  • anonymous
why is this the complete ground state electron configuration of a phosphorous atom? 1s^2 2s^2 2p^3 3s^2 3p^3 I was taught the numbers in the exponents must equal the number of electrons and these numbers do not add up
Chemistry
  • Stacey Warren - Expert brainly.com
Hey! We 've verified this expert answer for you, click below to unlock the details :)
SOLVED
At vero eos et accusamus et iusto odio dignissimos ducimus qui blanditiis praesentium voluptatum deleniti atque corrupti quos dolores et quas molestias excepturi sint occaecati cupiditate non provident, similique sunt in culpa qui officia deserunt mollitia animi, id est laborum et dolorum fuga. Et harum quidem rerum facilis est et expedita distinctio. Nam libero tempore, cum soluta nobis est eligendi optio cumque nihil impedit quo minus id quod maxime placeat facere possimus, omnis voluptas assumenda est, omnis dolor repellendus. Itaque earum rerum hic tenetur a sapiente delectus, ut aut reiciendis voluptatibus maiores alias consequatur aut perferendis doloribus asperiores repellat.
jamiebookeater
  • jamiebookeater
I got my questions answered at brainly.com in under 10 minutes. Go to brainly.com now for free help!
Rogue
  • Rogue
There's a mistake with the 2p orbitals for the config. you have. Phosphorus has 15 electrons in the ground state, so its configuration should be\[P: 1s^2 2s^2 2p^6 3s^2 3p^3\]
anonymous
  • anonymous
but the powers add up to 13
anonymous
  • anonymous
shouldnt they add up to 15?

Looking for something else?

Not the answer you are looking for? Search for more explanations.

More answers

Rogue
  • Rogue
Yes, they should. The one that the textbook/techer gave you is wrong.
anonymous
  • anonymous
thanks for letting me know. can you work with me please? Im preparing for a test. I have some more questions
anonymous
  • anonymous
calculate the frequency of red light at 650nm
anonymous
  • anonymous
the correct answer to this is 4.6 x 10^14 s^-1 but i dont see how. I got different exponents
Rogue
  • Rogue
That's an easy one.\[c = f \lambda\]c is a constant, its the speed of light, which is approx 3 x 10^8 m/s. f is frequency and lambda is wavelength.
anonymous
  • anonymous
c/f right?
anonymous
  • anonymous
but convert nm to m first
Rogue
  • Rogue
\[f = \frac {c}{\lambda}\]And yes, convert to meters first.
anonymous
  • anonymous
3.00 x 10^8/ 6.5 x 10^-7
anonymous
  • anonymous
i just get 4.61
anonymous
  • anonymous
no exp
anonymous
  • anonymous
nvm
anonymous
  • anonymous
actually explain sorry
Rogue
  • Rogue
:P negative exp
anonymous
  • anonymous
huh
Rogue
  • Rogue
I think you entered it in the calculator wrong
anonymous
  • anonymous
yea i figured thanks
Rogue
  • Rogue
Alright, np =)
anonymous
  • anonymous
while we are on frequency... A photon has a frequency of 6.5 x 10^3 MHz. Convert this frequency into wavelength, in nm
Rogue
  • Rogue
Same equation, convert MHz to Hz; solve for lambda. Hertz is just s^-1 btw.
anonymous
  • anonymous
6500000 Hz
anonymous
  • anonymous
3.00 x 10^8/6500000 = 46.153m
anonymous
  • anonymous
46.153m x 10^9nm= 4.615 x 10^10....the correct exp is suppose to be 7
Rogue
  • Rogue
The freq should be 6.5 x 10^9 Hz
anonymous
  • anonymous
6.5 x 10^3 (1000)?
anonymous
  • anonymous
thats what i entered and it gave me 6500000
Rogue
  • Rogue
6.5 x 10^3 MHz = 6.5 x 10^3 x 10^6 Hz = 6.5 GHz = 6.5 x 10^9 Hz
Rogue
  • Rogue
6500 megahertz to hertz...
anonymous
  • anonymous
ok
anonymous
  • anonymous
i see
anonymous
  • anonymous
whats after that
anonymous
  • anonymous
c/f?
Rogue
  • Rogue
yeah.
anonymous
  • anonymous
3.00 x 10^8/ 6.5 x 10^9
anonymous
  • anonymous
??
anonymous
  • anonymous
thanks
anonymous
  • anonymous
another question
anonymous
  • anonymous
Place the following in order of decreasing radius Br^(-), Kr, Se^(2-), Sr^(2+), Rb^(+)
Rogue
  • Rogue
Br^- has 35 protons and 36 electrons. Kr has 36 protons and 36 electrons. Rb^+ has 37 protons and 36 electrons. Sr^(2+) has 38 protons and 36 electrons. Think about the effective nuclear charge. The stronger the pull of the nucleus, the closer in electrons will go. All of the have the same # of electrons, but different # of protons. The one with the highest # of protons has the strongest pull and so the smallest radius. So the order in decreasing radius is Br^-, Kr, Rb^+, Sr^(2+)
anonymous
  • anonymous
wow thanks for that brilliant explanation
anonymous
  • anonymous
the electron spin quantum number has two possible values +1/2 and -1/2...how do you determine the value for instance when n=3 l=0 Ml=0 Ms= +1/2 and when n=3 l=0 Ml=0 Ms= -1/2

Looking for something else?

Not the answer you are looking for? Search for more explanations.