anonymous
  • anonymous
how do i introduce a quote or definition in my writing ?
Writing
  • Stacey Warren - Expert brainly.com
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schrodinger
  • schrodinger
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anonymous
  • anonymous
May you elaborate a little more on the definition aspect of the question? If you are introducing a quote, it is commonly recommended you use the TLQ style: transition, lead-in, quote. So based off of that, if I were quoting a book or something I would say, "So it goes" (Vonnegut pg. #). Then at the end of the essay you must cite the source.
anonymous
  • anonymous
As a famous man once said, "Ouch!" But that seems silly, which according to Webster, is "absurd, ridiculous, irrational."
anonymous
  • anonymous
this is the situation{ “A group of people having common interest or living in one locality.” This is the definition of the word community.} those are the first two sentences to my paragraph but it just doesn't seem right.

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anonymous
  • anonymous
Well, without seeing the rest of your paragraph, it is hard to say. But, you can try starting off with the following sentence: A community is defined as a group of people having common interests or living in one locality. And depending on your use, you might even leave out "defined as."
anonymous
  • anonymous
philips13 thank you
jagatuba
  • jagatuba
It doesn't seem right because it is a sentence fragment. So philips13 has it right.
jagatuba
  • jagatuba
Also it is common to transition into a quote (introduce as you put it) by stating the author's name followed by a verb and a comma then the quote. Example: Jones (2011) states, ". . . if this trend continues, inflation will hit a record high within 8 months" (p. A3). Note: parentheticals are APA style.

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