Here's the question you clicked on:

55 members online
  • 0 replying
  • 0 viewing

xxfreshboy

  • 4 years ago

Find the length of RQ

  • This Question is Closed
  1. xxfreshboy
    • 4 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    |dw:1332714826151:dw|

  2. No-data
    • 4 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 4

    |dw:1332714513106:dw|

  3. No-data
    • 4 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 4

    You know that RC = 13 cm and CQ = 13 cm

  4. antonioms
    • 4 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    What do I do I am lost for sure

  5. No-data
    • 4 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 4

    I think you just have to use some trygonometry

  6. xxfreshboy
    • 4 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    its geometry.

  7. No-data
    • 4 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 4

    You need to find RD and DQ first because RQ = RD + DQ

  8. No-data
    • 4 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 4

    \[DQ=\sqrt{13^2-5^2}\]

  9. No-data
    • 4 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 4

    and RD = DQ

  10. No-data
    • 4 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 4

    So \[RQ=2\sqrt{13^2-5^2}\]

  11. No-data
    • 4 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 4

    Thank you.

  12. antonioms
    • 4 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    Thank you but I still don't know how you broke it down

  13. No-data
    • 4 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 4

    With some reasonable asumptions. that RQ is perpendicular to CD

  14. No-data
    • 4 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 4

    Then you get an Isosceles triangle.

  15. No-data
    • 4 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 4

    You know the value of two sides of triangle DCQ. So you can use the phytagorean theorem.

  16. kell1170
    • 4 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 1

    What kind of geometry is that? I'm in geometry and I don't remember that

  17. No-data
    • 4 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 4

    Well I my country is it taught as Modern Geometry.

  18. No-data
    • 4 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 4

    in my country*

  19. kell1170
    • 4 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 1

    Oh dear... Modern geometry? I can barely handle the geometry I'm in. o.o I know the pathagroeum therom though!

  20. xxfreshboy
    • 4 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    first year geometry?

  21. kell1170
    • 4 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 1

    10th grade geometry. And first time taking it.

  22. xxfreshboy
    • 4 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    ooo where are you up to n your class?

  23. No-data
    • 4 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 4

    Modern geometry is the study of triangles, and circles. Is not that difficult lady.

  24. kell1170
    • 4 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 1

    We're doing translations, transformations, rotations, etc. And I don't know. You either get geometry or you don't. We've learned about circles and triangles and it was hard for me to understand.

  25. No-data
    • 4 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 4

    Well that is far more advanced than modern geometry.

  26. kell1170
    • 4 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 1

    Really?

  27. No-data
    • 4 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 4

    Yes. Maybe you know it but you don't remember.

  28. kell1170
    • 4 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 1

    Most likely... haha do you know how many degrees are in a square?

  29. No-data
    • 4 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 4

    Yes I know.

  30. kell1170
    • 4 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 1

    What is it?

  31. No-data
    • 4 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 4

    360º

  32. No-data
    • 4 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 4

    Am I wrong?

  33. kell1170
    • 4 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 1

    Oh I don't know! I didn't know that's why I asked!

  34. No-data
    • 4 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 4

    Well you just have to remember that a squared is formed by perpendicular lines. So they form 90º on each vertex.

  35. No-data
    • 4 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 4

    90º + 90º + 90º + 90º = 360º

  36. kell1170
    • 4 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 1

    Well then yes, you're right. Thank you for your help! :D

  37. No-data
    • 4 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 4

    You're welcome.

  38. Not the answer you are looking for?
    Search for more explanations.

    • Attachments:

Ask your own question

Sign Up
Find more explanations on OpenStudy
Privacy Policy