Quantcast

A community for students. Sign up today!

Here's the question you clicked on:

55 members online
  • 0 replying
  • 0 viewing

IsTim

  • 2 years ago

Given each scalar equation, write a vector equation. x=8

  • This Question is Closed
  1. IsTim
    • 2 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 1

    I was thinking that the normal vector was [8,0] and that the direction vector was [0,-8] and the position vector was [8,0].

  2. IsTim
    • 2 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 1

    I was wrong.

  3. IsTim
    • 2 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 1

    My final answer was [x,y]=[8,0]+t[0,-8]. But I am wrong.

  4. IsTim
    • 2 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 1

    MYsesshou, are you my savior in this dark time?

  5. IsTim
    • 2 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 1

    Assassin, are you able to assist me?

  6. mysesshou
    • 2 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    Actually, I'm not quite sure. Sorry !! Sorry for lag. I have been fighting my computer and this site for like an hour.

  7. IsTim
    • 2 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 1

    I think everyone has. Ok. Oh well.

  8. mysesshou
    • 2 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    was that the only info you're given?

  9. IsTim
    • 2 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 1

    Yes. Alongside the info in the textbook explaining how to do this.

  10. mysesshou
    • 2 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    I'm still searching, but can you apply something like this? http://www.blurtit.com/q1900770.html (google'd) I don't have your book... is it a calc book?

  11. IsTim
    • 2 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 1

    I dunno. Yes, it is a Calculus and Vectors book.

  12. IsTim
    • 2 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 1

    Are you able to help?

  13. mysesshou
    • 2 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    Probably not, but I've been searching

  14. IsTim
    • 2 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 1

    I'll rally up others just in case.

  15. mysesshou
    • 2 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    Sorry, it's just been too long for me for this to be recalled.

  16. IsTim
    • 2 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 1

    Yeah. Happened to me when I was helping someone else on inequalities.

  17. IsTim
    • 2 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 1

    @Zarkon Uh, someone told me to ask you.

  18. PaxPolaris
    • 2 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 2

    why is your answer wrong?

  19. IsTim
    • 2 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 1

    The actual answer is [x,y]=[8,2]+t[0,1].

  20. IsTim
    • 2 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 1

    Any clue?

  21. IsTim
    • 2 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 1

    I've double-checked to make sure the facts are right.

  22. PaxPolaris
    • 2 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 2

    the -8 isn't necessary but acceptable.... both your eq. and answer equation are acceptable...

  23. PaxPolaris
    • 2 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 2

    direction vector can be any vertical vector... starting point postion vector can refer to any point on line Infinite acceptable answers.

  24. IsTim
    • 2 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 1

    Like, I know that [8,0] can be anything, but my answer still isn't right in terms of t[0,1].

  25. mysesshou
    • 2 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    Sorry IsTim, I've searched through my calc book and solutions manual, but I guess 8-9 years is too long to remember enough of this. Hope PaxPolaris is able to help you understand. :)

  26. PaxPolaris
    • 2 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 2

    direction vector can be any vertical vector ... [0,1] and [0,-8] are both parallel to the line so both are acceptable ... any vector [0,C] is acceptable.

  27. IsTim
    • 2 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 1

    Wait, you're sure you're not talking about position vector?

  28. PaxPolaris
    • 2 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 2

    no, we're done with that...??

  29. IsTim
    • 2 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 1

    I don't know, they way you describe the direction vector sounds like the way my teacher described a position vector.

  30. PaxPolaris
    • 2 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 2

    Position Vector: of any 1 point on the line Direction Vector: any vector parallel to the line

  31. IsTim
    • 2 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 1

    But then what's the constant?

  32. PaxPolaris
    • 2 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 2

    the slope of the direction vector is constant ... the length of the direction vector is irrelevant

  33. IsTim
    • 2 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 1

    Ok. I'll just leave this question as is for now. Thanks for the help anyways, PAx.

  34. PaxPolaris
    • 2 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 2

    eg. if your direction vector is [1,2]: it can also be [2,4] , [3,6], [-5,-10]....[n,2n] preferably you'd use the simplest form i.e. [1,2] or in your case [0,1] instead of [0,-8] http://www.netcomuk.co.uk/~jenolive/vect3.html

  35. IsTim
    • 2 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 1

    Hey Sess, I'm good now. Thanks for staying though. I'll take a look at it Pax Polaris.

  36. mysesshou
    • 2 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    Evidently, my book wasn't good enough to help. I was reading through some of this, after p.4, that seemed that it might help some. http://mysite.science.uottawa.ca/vbozi013/mat1339/ch08.pdf PaxPolaris' site is good too :)

  37. mysesshou
    • 2 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    Yay PaxPolaris for the help !

  38. amistre64
    • 2 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    i think i missed the original problem as stated

  39. Not the answer you are looking for?
    Search for more explanations.

    Search OpenStudy
    • Attachments:

Ask your own question

Ask a Question
Find more explanations on OpenStudy

Your question is ready. Sign up for free to start getting answers.

spraguer (Moderator)
5 → View Detailed Profile

is replying to Can someone tell me what button the professor is hitting...

23

  • Teamwork 19 Teammate
  • Problem Solving 19 Hero
  • You have blocked this person.
  • ✔ You're a fan Checking fan status...

Thanks for being so helpful in mathematics. If you are getting quality help, make sure you spread the word about OpenStudy.

This is the testimonial you wrote.
You haven't written a testimonial for Owlfred.