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1dpp

  • 4 years ago

A can be both equiangular and equilateral. True False

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  1. 1dpp
    • 4 years ago
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    kite*

  2. MaryJSmith
    • 4 years ago
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    false

  3. 1dpp
    • 4 years ago
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    please explain

  4. MaryJSmith
    • 4 years ago
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    in a kite not all the sides are the same then its angles are not all equal

  5. lgbasallote
    • 4 years ago
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    if it's a square yes...90-90-90-90 is equiangular and equilateral

  6. Calcmathlete
    • 4 years ago
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    False because if all of the sides were equal and all sides were equal, it would be a square. In fact, by definition, it cannot be either without being classified by something else. A rhombus would be the equilateral one and a rectangle would be the equiangular one.

  7. Calcmathlete
    • 4 years ago
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    In addition, a square can take place of either.

  8. lgbasallote
    • 4 years ago
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    well the question is only CAN BE...so IF it's a square it is equiangular and equilateral yes? :)

  9. Calcmathlete
    • 4 years ago
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    A square is both equiangular and equilateral, but a square is not a kite.

  10. Calcmathlete
    • 4 years ago
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    They differ in definition.

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