anonymous
  • anonymous
The set W represents the elements present in water. W = {hydrogen, oxygen} The set C represents the elements present in carbon dioxide gas. C = {carbon, oxygen} How many elements are in the set W ∪ C? Choices: 1 2 3 4
Mathematics
  • Stacey Warren - Expert brainly.com
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SOLVED
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schrodinger
  • schrodinger
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anonymous
  • anonymous
3
TuringTest
  • TuringTest
really, how? could you explain?
TuringTest
  • TuringTest
I think it might be 4, cuz ther's 2 elemts in each set, ya know?

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More answers

anonymous
  • anonymous
Im trying to tutor my daughter so can you go into detail with this question ?
anonymous
  • anonymous
∪ = or W ∪ C means elements exists in one of the sets can be taken into account. So, hydrogen, oxygen,carbon, oxygen are all elements but oxygen appears twice. So, there are only 3 elements
anonymous
  • anonymous
|dw:1333211300473:dw| H=hidrogen C= Carbon and O=Oxygen now U it means all of them... and there are only 3 elements ! @tur
anonymous
  • anonymous
@tu it is called Vein Diagram check this out... Simple example ! http://www.google.com/imgres?hl=en&sa=X&biw=1152&bih=755&tbm=isch&prmd=imvns&tbnid=WmgxVxl3koHhyM:&imgrefurl=http://www.graphic.org/venbas.html&docid=UGVc2Rfr8pfowM&imgurl=http://www.graphic.org/images/venbas.gif&w=600&h=406&ei=VTF3T7KkFMvasgbwnMisBA&zoom=1&iact=hc&vpx=214&vpy=295&dur=2461&hovh=185&hovw=273&tx=159&ty=119&sig=101171057212841921160&page=1&tbnh=122&tbnw=180&start=0&ndsp=25&ved=1t:429,r:7,s:0
TuringTest
  • TuringTest
\[\cup\]means the "union" of the sets in other words we put the elemets in each individual set together into one set, and take out all the duplicates. for instance\[\{1,3,5\}\cup\{1,2,5\}=\{1,2,3,5,5\}\]but we don't count elements in sets more than once, so strike all the doubles/triples/etc. (in this case 5 is a double) so we get\[\{1,3,5\}\cup\{1,2,5\}=\{1,2,3,5\}\]
anonymous
  • anonymous
you wrote it right @tur but according to your last post... how many elements are there??
TuringTest
  • TuringTest
I was challenging you to explain your answer this site is designed to teach, not to give away answers of course \(I\) know the correct answer, but I think it is very uncool to just provide an answer without explanation ;)
anonymous
  • anonymous
@TuringTest ahh sorry then, I'll do better next time ;)
TuringTest
  • TuringTest
thanks, I appreciate it :)
Zarkon
  • Zarkon
TT was playing devil's advocate.. another way to look at it is the following Let \(n(A\cup B)\) be the number of elements in \(A\cup B\) then \(n(A\cup B)=n(A)+n(B)-n(A\cap B)\) so we have 2+2-1=3
anonymous
  • anonymous
The best way to solve these kind of problems i think is Vein's Diagram ! O_O
TuringTest
  • TuringTest
Zarkon's way is the most foolproof and rigorous learning that form of set theory in detail is definitely on my to-do list somewhere towards the middle though :/
anonymous
  • anonymous
you're right!
Zarkon
  • Zarkon
If the number of elements in the sets are small...then sure
TuringTest
  • TuringTest
^exactly
shaik0124
  • shaik0124
3
anonymous
  • anonymous
|dw:1371243366916:dw|
anonymous
  • anonymous
|dw:1371243432828:dw|

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