anonymous
  • anonymous
Use the following information to find the angle between the hands of a clock at 5:15. Each hour, the hour hand of a clock moves This is 'th of the way around the circle. This is · 360° = 30°. Each minute, the hour hand moves This is 'th of the distance it moves in one hour. This is · 30° = 0.5° Each minute, the minute hand moves 'th of the way around the circle. This is · 360° = 6°. Use the following information to find the angle between the hands of a clock at 5:15. Each hour, the hour hand of a clock moves This is 'th of the way around the circle. This is · 360° =
Mathematics
  • Stacey Warren - Expert brainly.com
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SOLVED
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schrodinger
  • schrodinger
I got my questions answered at brainly.com in under 10 minutes. Go to brainly.com now for free help!
anonymous
  • anonymous
I'll use the word interval to refer to the spacing between one number and a number adjacent to it on a clock. 12 of these in a clock and 360 degrees in a circle (clocks are circular), so each interval is 360/12 = 30 degrees. If it's 15 minutes past five, the hand is at 5 and then a quarter of the way to 6. 5 and a quarter intervals = 30 * 5.25 = 157.5 degrees. If the minute hand has gone for 15 minutes, it's at the 3. That's 3 intervals, so: 3 * 30 = 90. We want the distance between those two which is just the difference. 157.5 - 90 = 67.5
anonymous
  • anonymous
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anonymous
  • anonymous
@Hero 150 degrees assumes that the time is 5:00 sharp. If the minute hand moves a minute so does the hour hand, 1/60th of the distance. 15 minutes means it's a quarter of the way to the 6.

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Hero
  • Hero
I hate clocks
anonymous
  • anonymous
Lol
Hero
  • Hero
@bluepig148 is correct although his solution could have been clearer.
anonymous
  • anonymous
@Hero What was confusing about it?
Hero
  • Hero
I didn't say I was confused about it. Someone else might be though. When I say stuff, I'm not really speaking for myself, but for other people.
anonymous
  • anonymous
I know, that's why I didn't say what didn't you understand. What do you think other people would get confused on?
Hero
  • Hero
Well, for one, If I were going to go that in-depth into explaining this, I would have included the four tick marks between hours 5 and 6 on the clock and emphasizing the "quarter" increments that each tick mark represents. Two, I would have used proportions to represent the relationship between the part/whole relationship between the clock and a circle. For example: \[\frac{5}{12} = \frac{\theta}{360} \]
Hero
  • Hero
Maybe I'm being picky. At least your answer is correct. I verified it after the hint you gave me when I realized my approach was wrong.
anonymous
  • anonymous
I was answering the question for the asker, and with the information (s)he gave it seemed like they had a basic understand of circles/clocks. Didn't think it was necessary to do some of the stuff you listed. Why not explain why circles have 360 degrees or how fractions are simplified/proportions are solved? Lol
Hero
  • Hero
If that were true, they probably wouldn't have needed to post the question.
anonymous
  • anonymous
I don't agree with that. There were a lot of places to mess up on. Maybe they fell into the same trap you did, doesn't mean they didn't understand what they were given.
Hero
  • Hero
@bluepig148 , I was just trying to help you create a simpler explanation. You did ask.
anonymous
  • anonymous
Sorry if I came across as mean; I like arguing. I just think that there is always a simpler explanation - if every time we answered a question on openstudy we wrote paragraphs and paragraphs about basic arithmetic then nobody would get anywhere, it would take far too long! There has to be some cutoff where you stop explaining and take it that they will understand, and I believe the points that you mentioned are past the cutoff for this asker.
Hero
  • Hero
A good solution should include the simplest most basic steps to the result. Often times, those are the solutions that are more impressive than using more advanced approaches.
Hero
  • Hero
Also, your explanation makes assumptions. You assume that the other person knows about clocks/circles, etc. My solution wouldn't have made such assumptions.
anonymous
  • anonymous
I'm 99.9% sure you would have made others. Assumptions that they know how to add, that they know basic notation, that they know what an angle is, that they know what a degree is, etc...
Hero
  • Hero
Yes, of course, I would assume those things, but what I'm saying is, this question involves clocks and circles and those are the two things I wouldn't have made assumptions of. I would assume however, that the person knows what degrees are, what angles are, what 360 is, what a proportion is, etc. I wouldn't have made assumptions about the clocks and circles, however, because that's exactly what may be the source of their confusion regarding the question. All I'm saying is, my solution would have been simple and easy to understand.
anonymous
  • anonymous
Well, I guess the asker will have to say what they know about the subject. All my assumptions were basic (360 degrees in a circle, 12 numbers on a clock), and this definitely isn't a basic clock problem. It's extremely unlikely that they would have been exposed to this kind of material in whatever course/textbook/etc they're taking before being exposed to simpler versions, so I figured they would be able to follow.
Hero
  • Hero
I would say that the real confusion may not necessarily be related to the clocks and circles, but with some of your descriptions.
anonymous
  • anonymous
So you're dropping your original argument?
Hero
  • Hero
I was making that comment in addition to the previous statements.
Hero
  • Hero
I'm saying that the combination of the possible confusion with the clocks/circles, along with your descriptions could result in some confusion.
Hero
  • Hero
And that the explanations could be clearer. That is all.
anonymous
  • anonymous
Okay, I can imagine this going on forever so I'm going to stop. Hopefully the asker comes back and says something.
anonymous
  • anonymous
And if I go to one of your answers and say part of it was ambiguous it's just a joke XD.
Hero
  • Hero
Please do not make it personal. I was only trying to help.
anonymous
  • anonymous
Sorry, I won't. Was only going to do it in good fun.

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