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crazycookiecat

Ok, I'm just making sure, but if I had to find the rate of change between one number and another, I just divided them? :O so 110 divided by 50?

  • 2 years ago
  • 2 years ago

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  1. crazycookiecat
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    2.2?

    • 2 years ago
  2. angelaum
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    sorry my question was , was my statment true or false

    • 2 years ago
  3. crazycookiecat
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    What do you mean?

    • 2 years ago
  4. amistre64
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    a rate of change is a ratio or proportion that you can calculate between 2 ... things.

    • 2 years ago
  5. amistre64
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    the rate of change between 5 and 7 is rather undefined unless you use a unit of time to compare too; like 2/3sec

    • 2 years ago
  6. crazycookiecat
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    Thats confusing, but, like I have a problem that says "find the approximate rate of change between 1970 and 1975." And on the graph, the numbers for those years are 50 and 110. So I divided them like you said? :o

    • 2 years ago
  7. amistre64
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    in a way, yes; but becasue these dont intersect with the (0,0) we can be sure that they are moving in sync like that it is best to divide the change between them instead 1970 to 1975 is a change of 5 50 to 110 is a change of 60 therefore we can say for certain that the rate of change is 60/5

    • 2 years ago
  8. amistre64
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    becasue they dont intersect at (0,0) we CANT be sure .... one little letter just changes the whole meaning sodent it

    • 2 years ago
  9. crazycookiecat
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    So...what do I do?

    • 2 years ago
  10. amistre64
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    read the post thats 4 above this one.

    • 2 years ago
  11. crazycookiecat
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    Oh I didnt see that :P ok thanks

    • 2 years ago
  12. amistre64
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    :) i was hoping it was something to that effect casue i really dont know how to explain it any simpler

    • 2 years ago
  13. crazycookiecat
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    Yeah its confusing :P like I have another one, its rate of change between 1995 and 2000. Im just kinda going with the effect of what you said ...idk if im right, but approximately 2000 divided by 1995 is 1.003, and 690 divided by 600 (the numbers for those years on the graph) is 1.3...so what, 1.003/1.3?? Confusedd :P

    • 2 years ago
  14. KingGeorge
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    Basically, what you're doing is finding the slope of a graph where the x-values are years and the y-values are those other number.

    • 2 years ago
  15. slaaibak
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    no... 2000 - 1995 = 5 690 - 600 = 90 90 / 5 = 18

    • 2 years ago
  16. KingGeorge
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    So if you have two points \((1995, 600)\), and \((2000, 690)\). Now you need to find the slope between those two points.

    • 2 years ago
  17. KingGeorge
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    As slaaibak pointed out, the slope would be 18.

    • 2 years ago
  18. crazycookiecat
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    Well @KingGeorge we havent learned how to find the slope yet. And that makes sense @slaaibak, thanks :)

    • 2 years ago
  19. crazycookiecat
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    Ohkkkayy, I see now. Thanks

    • 2 years ago
  20. KingGeorge
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    I suppose not knowing how to find slope would make it harder. :)

    • 2 years ago
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