anonymous
  • anonymous
explain why it is important to check your brake fluid regularly. explain what happens to the fluid when you step on the brake of a car and how that fluid then acts to make the car slow down. and explain why it is important to make sure that your car always has an adequate supply of brake fluid.
Physics
  • Stacey Warren - Expert brainly.com
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katieb
  • katieb
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Shayaan_Mustafa
  • Shayaan_Mustafa
because thickness of the fluid no more remains. therefore it is regularly changed. if we push the brake then fluid moves towards the brake shoe and the result brake shoe holds the car axel and car is stopped. if fluid is filled much in amount then small amount of brake will cause then car to stop suddenly and we feel a jerk. if fluid is filled less in amount then we have to powerly press the brakes then car will slow down not stop. this can cause accident in immidiate situations. therefore fluid must be in adequate amount. ANY QUESTION?
anonymous
  • anonymous
Shayaan_Mustafa is correct
Shayaan_Mustafa
  • Shayaan_Mustafa
Ahhh... Thanks buddy.

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anonymous
  • anonymous
Shayaan's explanation is incorrect. Consider that brake fluid is incompressible. As we apply braking pressure to the brake pedel, this pressure is transmitted to the brakes. (See Pascal's Law) If the brake fluid level gets low (which occurs as the brake pads wear down and more fluid is required to fill the brake system) and air is sucked into the brake system, we will lose the ability to brake. Because air is very compressible, as we apply the brakes, we must push the brakes further as the air is compressed. Eventually, the brake pedal reaches the floor and we have not been able to generate enough pressure in the brake system to brake the car.
anonymous
  • anonymous
Brake fluid is a type of hydraulic fluid used in hydraulic brake and hydraulic clutch applications in automobiles, motorcycles, light trucks, and some bicycles. It is used to transfer force into pressure. It works because liquids are not appreciably compressible - in their natural state the component molecules do not have internal voids and the molecules pack together well, so bulk forces are directly transferred to trying to compress the fluid's chemical bonds. Because oils damage rubber seals and hoses in the braking system, brake fluids are not petroleum-based. Most brake fluids used today are glycol-ether based, but mineral oil (Citroën liquide hydraulique minéral (LHM) and silicone (DOT 5) based fluids are also available. Brake fluids must meet certain requirements as defined by various standards set by organizations such as the SAE, or local government equivalents. For example, most brake fluid sold in North America is classified by the US Department of Transportation (DOT) under their own ratings such as "DOT 3" and "DOT 4". Their classifications broadly reflect the concerns addressed by the SAE's specifications, but with local details - Alaska and the Azores have different normal temperature and humidity ranges to consider, for example. Many countries defer explicitly to the SAE specifications, or simply refer to "best practice" which in practice would defer to the SAE.
ujjwal
  • ujjwal
Pressure we apply to brake is very high (less area) , this pressure is transmitted to brake pads, the pressure is still the same, however the force is greater (due to large area of brake pads).. this is how brake works in a car or any vehicle.. regarding why is it imp to check brake fluid is already effectively explained by eashmore ..

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