anonymous
  • anonymous
2mL of I2/KI aqueous solution and 2 mL of varsol are added. These two are immiscible, so they form two layers. 2 drops of sodium thiosulphate are added to this. What happened was that Phase A (varsol) turned lighter than control (pink), and Phase B (I2/KI) turned lighter than control (yellow)
Chemistry
  • Stacey Warren - Expert brainly.com
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SOLVED
At vero eos et accusamus et iusto odio dignissimos ducimus qui blanditiis praesentium voluptatum deleniti atque corrupti quos dolores et quas molestias excepturi sint occaecati cupiditate non provident, similique sunt in culpa qui officia deserunt mollitia animi, id est laborum et dolorum fuga. Et harum quidem rerum facilis est et expedita distinctio. Nam libero tempore, cum soluta nobis est eligendi optio cumque nihil impedit quo minus id quod maxime placeat facere possimus, omnis voluptas assumenda est, omnis dolor repellendus. Itaque earum rerum hic tenetur a sapiente delectus, ut aut reiciendis voluptatibus maiores alias consequatur aut perferendis doloribus asperiores repellat.
schrodinger
  • schrodinger
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anonymous
  • anonymous
So, why did this happen when taking into account the chemistry perspective?
anonymous
  • anonymous
I figured out.
anonymous
  • anonymous
I'm not sure about the varsol but i do know the thiosulfate reduces the iodine in solution to iodide which is why b goes clear.

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anonymous
  • anonymous
2 S2O32āˆ’(aq) + I2(aq) ā†’ S4O62āˆ’(aq) + 2 Iāˆ’(aq)
anonymous
  • anonymous
Wikipedia FTW
anonymous
  • anonymous
This occurred in both solutions, and I interpreted it from there.
anonymous
  • anonymous
Ok could you help me with the last question I have.
anonymous
  • anonymous
It is this:
anonymous
  • anonymous
sure
anonymous
  • anonymous
You have this solution: Put 5 mL of 0.1M magnesium chloride into a test tube. Add 5mL of 1M ammonium solution. Shake to mix and observe. Add 1g of ammonium chloride and shake well. Observe again What are the possible reactions and/or equilibria that can be taking place here?
anonymous
  • anonymous
This is what I got so far: NH3(aq) + H2O(l) <=> NH4+(aq) + OH-(aq) ^- because it was an aqueous solution of NH3(aq) <-- I forgot to mention that.
anonymous
  • anonymous
and then there is NH3, Mg, Cl NH3 + MgCl2 --> NO REACTION?
anonymous
  • anonymous
Professor's reply: I can suggest that you consider what other possible products could be made from the combination of ions that you have present in your solution(s). You are missing some key reactions/equilibria in your analysis.
anonymous
  • anonymous
He probably means MgOH2. Becuase when NH3 goes into water it will form NH4 and OH ions. Which means that MgOH2 will probably form with NH4Cl added. I'll come up with a link or better answer.
anonymous
  • anonymous
is magnesium hydroxide a slighty soluble comp/ d
anonymous
  • anonymous
?
anonymous
  • anonymous
Yes it is
anonymous
  • anonymous
\[Mg^{2+}_{(aq)} + 2NH^3_{(aq)} + 2H_2O_{(l)} <==> Mg(OH)_{2(s)} + 2NH4^+_{(aq)}\]
anonymous
  • anonymous
then on addition of NH4 you can see how it would shift left and the ppt will dissolve
anonymous
  • anonymous
It will shift left due to common ion NH3?
anonymous
  • anonymous
because I had: NH3(aq) + H2O(l) <=> NH4+(aq) + OH-(aq)
anonymous
  • anonymous
SORRY
anonymous
  • anonymous
Common ion NH4+
anonymous
  • anonymous
Common ion NH4+
anonymous
  • anonymous
Yeah.
anonymous
  • anonymous
The equation i gave you will be the first one your professor is looking for. Now just say that on addition of excess NH4+ from the ammonium chloride that the precipitate will dissolve due to le chatlier's principal.
anonymous
  • anonymous
So does that make sense QRA?

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