anonymous
  • anonymous
im trying to draw the lewis structure for NaNO3 im having trouble. can oxygen bond to itself?
Chemistry
  • Stacey Warren - Expert brainly.com
Hey! We 've verified this expert answer for you, click below to unlock the details :)
SOLVED
At vero eos et accusamus et iusto odio dignissimos ducimus qui blanditiis praesentium voluptatum deleniti atque corrupti quos dolores et quas molestias excepturi sint occaecati cupiditate non provident, similique sunt in culpa qui officia deserunt mollitia animi, id est laborum et dolorum fuga. Et harum quidem rerum facilis est et expedita distinctio. Nam libero tempore, cum soluta nobis est eligendi optio cumque nihil impedit quo minus id quod maxime placeat facere possimus, omnis voluptas assumenda est, omnis dolor repellendus. Itaque earum rerum hic tenetur a sapiente delectus, ut aut reiciendis voluptatibus maiores alias consequatur aut perferendis doloribus asperiores repellat.
katieb
  • katieb
I got my questions answered at brainly.com in under 10 minutes. Go to brainly.com now for free help!
anonymous
  • anonymous
would the bond be Na::O::O:: :: :N -
anonymous
  • anonymous
|dw:1333509576222:dw|
anonymous
  • anonymous
The oxygens on the left resonate. On will be stable while the other has a formal charge of minus one. Both the nitrogen and sodium will have formal charges of +1 .

Looking for something else?

Not the answer you are looking for? Search for more explanations.

More answers

anonymous
  • anonymous
the book says this . Obtain the total number of valence electrons to be used in the structure by adding the number of valence electrons in all the atoms in the molecule or ion. If you are writing the structure of an ion, add one electron for each negative charge or subtract one electron for each positive charge on the ion. 2. Write the skeletal arrangement of the atoms and connect them with a single co- valent bond (two dots or one dash). Hydrogen, which contains only one bond- ing electron, can form only one covalent bond. Oxygen atoms are not normally bonded to each other, except in compounds known to be peroxides. Oxygen atoms normally have a maximum of two covalent bonds (two single bonds or one double bond). 3. Subtract two electrons for each single bond you used in Step 2 from the total number of electrons calculated in Step 1. This gives you the net number of elec- trons available for completing the structure. 4. Distribute pairs of electrons (pairs of dots) around each atom (except hydro- gen) to give each atom a noble gas structure. 5. If there are not enough electrons to give these atoms eight electrons, change single bonds between atoms to double or triple bonds by shifting unbonded pairs of electrons as needed. Check to see that each atom has a noble gas electron structure (two electrons for hydrogen and eight for the others). A double bond counts as four electrons for each atom to which it is bonded. is what ur doing diff?
anonymous
  • anonymous
Well what I did was a little more advanced. It is correct i'm 100% certain. I'm assuming this is your first chem class or still introductory chem right? Have you learned formal charges? Even if I was the teacher I wouldn't have assigned NaNO3 because it's tricky. Sorry if it's confusing. Wikipedia will confirm it's right.
anonymous
  • anonymous
i dont think we have
anonymous
  • anonymous
Yeah was this homework?
anonymous
  • anonymous
I'm glad you're studying ahead. I would recommend reading more on formal charges. It will make a lot more sense then.

Looking for something else?

Not the answer you are looking for? Search for more explanations.