anonymous
  • anonymous
i don't understand the kVL and KCL
MIT 6.002 Circuits and Electronics, Spring 2007
  • Stacey Warren - Expert brainly.com
Hey! We 've verified this expert answer for you, click below to unlock the details :)
SOLVED
At vero eos et accusamus et iusto odio dignissimos ducimus qui blanditiis praesentium voluptatum deleniti atque corrupti quos dolores et quas molestias excepturi sint occaecati cupiditate non provident, similique sunt in culpa qui officia deserunt mollitia animi, id est laborum et dolorum fuga. Et harum quidem rerum facilis est et expedita distinctio. Nam libero tempore, cum soluta nobis est eligendi optio cumque nihil impedit quo minus id quod maxime placeat facere possimus, omnis voluptas assumenda est, omnis dolor repellendus. Itaque earum rerum hic tenetur a sapiente delectus, ut aut reiciendis voluptatibus maiores alias consequatur aut perferendis doloribus asperiores repellat.
katieb
  • katieb
I got my questions answered at brainly.com in under 10 minutes. Go to brainly.com now for free help!
anonymous
  • anonymous
check these notes,i think so useful!!!!!!! for KVL & KCL!!!
anonymous
  • anonymous
|dw:1333646399673:dw|KVL states that the applieid voltage of a series circuit is equal to the sum ofvoltage drops across the series elements.
anonymous
  • anonymous
|dw:1333646830840:dw|KCL states that the algebraic sum of all currents entering and leaving any node in a circuit is zero

Looking for something else?

Not the answer you are looking for? Search for more explanations.

More answers

anonymous
  • anonymous
KVL is the voltage law. If instead of voltage, you were to think of elevation in a building. Then you took a long extension cord and left one end on the floor. Then took the other end up the stairs, down the hall, down another staircase, back down a hall and returned to your starting point and plugged the ends together. You are back to where you started elevation wise. You could have dragged the other end out windows, down the street, through the basement, etc. As long as both ends are plugged into each other, you created a loop. You might go up in elevation, or down as you walk along that loop. But by the time you return to your starting point, you returned to the starting elevation. So if you carefully add up all the changes in elevation as you walked that loop, you have to end up with a net elevation change of zero. KVL is using voltage instead of elevation, and then putting this idea into an algebraic format. Add up all the voltage changes along a loop, and they add up to zero. Does that help?

Looking for something else?

Not the answer you are looking for? Search for more explanations.