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NotTim

  • 4 years ago

USe an example to show that (k+m)u=ku+mu

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  1. NotTim
    • 4 years ago
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    i was thinking: why not just use dummy variables, like k=10, i=9 and m=3, but is there something deeper?

  2. Hero
    • 4 years ago
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    Nope, that is the correct course of action. That would be the only way to prove by example.

  3. NotTim
    • 4 years ago
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    i was thinking that it was MUCH more complex than that..

  4. Hero
    • 4 years ago
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    If (k + m)u = ku + mu , you should be able to set variables k,m and u equal to any random numbers and both sides should come out equal.

  5. Hero
    • 4 years ago
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    I doubt if it is any more complex than that.

  6. NotTim
    • 4 years ago
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    this was simple. to me, simple means secretly hard. thank you for clarifying

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