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TomLikesPhysics

  • 4 years ago

Why are the planets that are further away from the sun mostly made up of some gas. One might think that they should be made up of some solid stuff because they are so far away and therefore it should be very cold (in comparison to the earth). So why is for example Jupiter a gas giant? Does he turn slowly into a fluid giant because he is cooling down?

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  1. TuringTest
    • 4 years ago
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    The gas giants (Jupiter, Saturn, Uranus, and Neptune) formed further out, beyond the frost line, the point between the orbits of Mars and Jupiter where the material is cool enough for volatile icy compounds to remain solid. The ices that formed the Jovian planets were more abundant than the metals and silicates that formed the terrestrial planets, allowing the Jovian planets to grow massive enough to capture hydrogen and helium, the lightest and most abundant elements. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Formation_and_evolution_of_the_Solar_System -I feel like I have heard this in more detail, but cannot remember enough to elaborate much.

  2. UnkleRhaukus
    • 4 years ago
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    the gas giants are solid on the inside, they just have more gases around them, and we can see through it. Interestingly Jupiter has enough mass -and hence gravitational attraction) towards the center that matter is being converted to heat (fusion) a bit like our sun but not as much

  3. UnkleRhaukus
    • 4 years ago
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    can not see through it*

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