Here's the question you clicked on:

55 members online
  • 0 replying
  • 0 viewing

kiara23

  • 4 years ago

Create your own polynomial with a degree greater than 2

  • This Question is Closed
  1. lgbasallote
    • 4 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 1

    quadratic equations...

  2. campbell_st
    • 4 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    y=x^3

  3. kiara23
    • 4 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    solve please.

  4. SmoothMath
    • 4 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 1

    The degree of a polynomial is the same as the highest exponent of the variable present. Here are some polynomials and their degrees: 5x^3 + 4x^2 -10 is degree 3 20x^5 - 14 is degree 5 12x-3 is degree 1 x^7 is degree 7 56-43x^3 + x^4 is degree 4

  5. campbell_st
    • 4 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    in what way....I need it to equal some value e.g x = 0, then y = 0 if y = -1 x = -1, y = -8 then x = -2 x = 3 y = 27

  6. marissapaige
    • 4 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 1

    Quadratic equations do not have a degree greater than two; rather, they have a degree of two. The way to determine the degree of a polynomial is by examining all the exponents. Find the biggest exponent. That's the degree. Suppose the biggest exponent in a polynomial was 6; then, the degree is 6. Here's a polynomial with a degree greater than two: \[x ^{5} + 3y ^{4} - 2k ^{3} + 10h ^{2}\]

  7. marissapaige
    • 4 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 1

    Sorry, forgot to add that the degree of the equation I gave you is five, because it is the greatest exponent.

  8. Not the answer you are looking for?
    Search for more explanations.

    • Attachments:

Ask your own question

Sign Up
Find more explanations on OpenStudy
Privacy Policy