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nuemikura

  • 4 years ago

"We deal on a strictly cash basis." Why is this correct? Why not "We deal on a strict cash basis" ?

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  1. BieberLove
    • 4 years ago
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    umm totally guessing but maybe the strictly is like only some times and strict is like they r doin it all the time?? lol just guessing!!??

  2. A_clan
    • 4 years ago
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    'strictly' is an adverb which describes the verb , which in this case is describing 'deal' and not 'cash' or 'basis' ( which are both noun) This sentence could be rephrased as We strictly deal on cash basis. Or We deal strictly on cash basis.

  3. nuemikura
    • 4 years ago
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    According to Purdue OWL, choosing from "We deal on a strict/strictly cash basis," the correct answer is "We deal on a strictly cash basis." The word order you've proposed is not an option, unfortunately, because what you've written makes perfect sense. However, it doesn't actually answer my original question, I'm afraid. >_< Thanks for trying, though. [ http://owl.english.purdue.edu/exercises/2/2/8/answer ]

  4. Dyiliq
    • 4 years ago
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    "We deal strictly on a cash-basis." "We deal on a strict cash-basis." "We strictly deal on a cash-basis." "We deal on a cash-basis, strictly."

  5. Carl_Pham
    • 4 years ago
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    "Strict" is an adjective, and can only modify "cash," and "strict cash" makes no sense. "Strictly" is an adverb, and can modify "deal," which is what you mean. This is what A_clan is saying, and it is correct.

  6. Dyiliq
    • 4 years ago
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    "Strict cash" isn't what I said.

  7. Dyiliq
    • 4 years ago
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    I'm used to saying cash-only-basis but I said cash-basis for the sake of consistency in this question.

  8. QuantBoy
    • 4 years ago
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    Agreeing with A_clan and Carl_Pham, Strictly is an adverb. Adverbs modify verbs (like deal). Strict is an adjective. Adjectives modify nouns (like cash). I found your question on OWL. http://owl.english.purdue.edu/exercises/2/2/8/answer I think OWL has misplaced their modifier. In this case, the adverb "strictly" probably applies to "deal," but they have placed the adverb in a strange position. So, OWL has the right idea, but wrong execution. You might let them know. :-)

  9. Dyiliq
    • 4 years ago
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    I don't want to come across as a jerk, I'm always smiling and happy. Sometimes in my typing I sound pompous and arrogant. I apologize in advance! :) But I didn't say 'Strict cash'. Since that's not what I said, his response does't apply. 'Cash' is indeed an adjective. But 'cash-basis' is in fact a noun...So saying "Strict cash-basis" would be grammatically acceptable.

  10. Dyiliq
    • 4 years ago
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    This question is all over the web it seems.....Too much, I couldn't even imagine wading through it all to find any kind of agreement being made. I think this is a raging debate that will only be solved by the actual induction of 'cash-basis' as well as 'cash basis' into English as both a verb and a noun.

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