anonymous
  • anonymous
"We deal on a strictly cash basis." Why is this correct? Why not "We deal on a strict cash basis" ?
Writing
  • Stacey Warren - Expert brainly.com
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jamiebookeater
  • jamiebookeater
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anonymous
  • anonymous
umm totally guessing but maybe the strictly is like only some times and strict is like they r doin it all the time?? lol just guessing!!??
A_clan
  • A_clan
'strictly' is an adverb which describes the verb , which in this case is describing 'deal' and not 'cash' or 'basis' ( which are both noun) This sentence could be rephrased as We strictly deal on cash basis. Or We deal strictly on cash basis.
anonymous
  • anonymous
According to Purdue OWL, choosing from "We deal on a strict/strictly cash basis," the correct answer is "We deal on a strictly cash basis." The word order you've proposed is not an option, unfortunately, because what you've written makes perfect sense. However, it doesn't actually answer my original question, I'm afraid. >_< Thanks for trying, though. [http://owl.english.purdue.edu/exercises/2/2/8/answer]

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anonymous
  • anonymous
"We deal strictly on a cash-basis." "We deal on a strict cash-basis." "We strictly deal on a cash-basis." "We deal on a cash-basis, strictly."
anonymous
  • anonymous
"Strict" is an adjective, and can only modify "cash," and "strict cash" makes no sense. "Strictly" is an adverb, and can modify "deal," which is what you mean. This is what A_clan is saying, and it is correct.
anonymous
  • anonymous
"Strict cash" isn't what I said.
anonymous
  • anonymous
I'm used to saying cash-only-basis but I said cash-basis for the sake of consistency in this question.
anonymous
  • anonymous
Agreeing with A_clan and Carl_Pham, Strictly is an adverb. Adverbs modify verbs (like deal). Strict is an adjective. Adjectives modify nouns (like cash). I found your question on OWL. http://owl.english.purdue.edu/exercises/2/2/8/answer I think OWL has misplaced their modifier. In this case, the adverb "strictly" probably applies to "deal," but they have placed the adverb in a strange position. So, OWL has the right idea, but wrong execution. You might let them know. :-)
anonymous
  • anonymous
I don't want to come across as a jerk, I'm always smiling and happy. Sometimes in my typing I sound pompous and arrogant. I apologize in advance! :) But I didn't say 'Strict cash'. Since that's not what I said, his response does't apply. 'Cash' is indeed an adjective. But 'cash-basis' is in fact a noun...So saying "Strict cash-basis" would be grammatically acceptable.
anonymous
  • anonymous
This question is all over the web it seems.....Too much, I couldn't even imagine wading through it all to find any kind of agreement being made. I think this is a raging debate that will only be solved by the actual induction of 'cash-basis' as well as 'cash basis' into English as both a verb and a noun.

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