Here's the question you clicked on:

55 members online
  • 0 replying
  • 0 viewing

nickymarden

  • 4 years ago

...

  • This Question is Closed
  1. nickymarden
    • 4 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    \[\lim_{x \rightarrow 0} cosx-1/x\]

  2. Thomas9
    • 4 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 1

    cos(x-1/x)?

  3. nickymarden
    • 4 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    (cosx-1)/x

  4. Thomas9
    • 4 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 1

    I had my answer ready for the other one, I need to think about this one.

  5. TuringTest
    • 4 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 2

    are you allowed to use l'Hospitals rule?

  6. nickymarden
    • 4 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    nope. Professor said that if we use it he won't consider the answer

  7. TuringTest
    • 4 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 2

    well this limit is very well-known, and is usually proven geometrically, so... I'm not sure what we want to do here

  8. nickymarden
    • 4 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    there are 2 ways to finding the answer, and I know it's 0. I know one of them, wich takes too long, i want the other.

  9. Thomas9
    • 4 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 1

    You can write cos(x) as a series, that'll work.

  10. TuringTest
    • 4 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 2

    ^that is true, that would be the only other way to prove it besides the geometric way which is given here: http://ocw.mit.edu/courses/mathematics/18-01sc-single-variable-calculus-fall-2010/part-a-definition-and-basic-rules/session-7-derivatives-of-sine-and-cosine/

  11. TuringTest
    • 4 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 2

    so there are technically 3 ways of finding the answer

  12. nickymarden
    • 4 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    yep. MIT always saving my life. Thanks again :P

  13. TuringTest
    • 4 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 2

    that is the long way though^ the "short" way is l'Hospitals rule

  14. TuringTest
    • 4 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 2

    but you're welcome :)

  15. Not the answer you are looking for?
    Search for more explanations.

    • Attachments:

Ask your own question

Sign Up
Find more explanations on OpenStudy
Privacy Policy