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adeniyta Group Title

Hey- could someone please help me with the free body diagrams. If there is a hand pushing on a book,laying on a table- what are the forces acting on the book? I thought they were normal force, force of hand and gravity.

  • 2 years ago
  • 2 years ago

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  1. eashmore Group Title
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    Consider the presence of a friction force as well. It will be directed opposite the force of the hand. Otherwise, the three you named is it.

    • 2 years ago
  2. adeniyta Group Title
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    Will there be friction, if the hand is acting upon the book from above?

    • 2 years ago
  3. UnkleRhaukus Group Title
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    |dw:1334633188981:dw|

    • 2 years ago
  4. adeniyta Group Title
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    Okay thank you this was very helpful.

    • 2 years ago
  5. adeniyta Group Title
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    If the book is being pushed up a wall what forces would affect the book? Here is what I think?

    • 2 years ago
  6. adeniyta Group Title
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    |dw:1334634207666:dw|

    • 2 years ago
  7. eashmore Group Title
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    Gravity does not act on the book in the horizontal direction. If the applied force is vertical, there will be no normal force between the book and the wall and thereby no friction force. |dw:1334635152412:dw|

    • 2 years ago
  8. adeniyta Group Title
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    Isn't there friction because there are two surfaces in contact with each other?

    • 2 years ago
  9. quarkine Group Title
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    yeah but only is when surfaces are moving wrt each other..

    • 2 years ago
  10. eashmore Group Title
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    From Coulomb's Friction model, there must be a normal force present between the two. In this basic case, there is no normal force between the wall and the book and therefore, no friction force.

    • 2 years ago
  11. eashmore Group Title
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    Coulomb's friction model is\[F_f = mu N\]

    • 2 years ago
  12. eashmore Group Title
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    We can't simply create a normal force because we desire to have friction.

    • 2 years ago
  13. adeniyta Group Title
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    Hmm.... this is interesting that's seems kind of strange, but I understand it.

    • 2 years ago
  14. adeniyta Group Title
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    I have one more quick question (thank you for your patience): If there are for links connected together and are suspended by a rope. Here is what I thinks and a picture:

    • 2 years ago
  15. adeniyta Group Title
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    |dw:1334636071637:dw|

    • 2 years ago
  16. adeniyta Group Title
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    The force on 1= tension of rope and weight of rings 2,3 and 4. The force on 2= tension caused by chain link 2 and force of weight of 3 and 4. The force on 3 = tension caused by chain links 1 and 2 and weight of 4. The force on 4= tension caused by chain links 1,2 and 3 and force of gravity.

    • 2 years ago
  17. eashmore Group Title
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    Indeed. Realize that tension of the rope must equal the weight of all four ring if the links aren't moving.

    • 2 years ago
  18. adeniyta Group Title
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    k- good I think I get the concept. Thank you a ton- you are very patient.

    • 2 years ago
  19. eashmore Group Title
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    You're very welcome!

    • 2 years ago
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