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shadmanr163

  • 4 years ago

Are there any common tricks with inverse and direct variation? Examples would be very helpful for me.

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  1. badreferences
    • 4 years ago
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    Let's say I was able to measure productivity \(w\), profit \(p\), and cost of materials \(c\) quantitatively. A reasonable model for an explicitly simple system would be:\[p=\frac{w}{c}\]Now, which variables vary directly, and which vary indirectly? Tell me what you think. Even if it's wrong.

  2. shadmanr163
    • 4 years ago
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    Vary Directly-c Vary indirecly-w I am not sure.

  3. badreferences
    • 4 years ago
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    Alright, so as \(p\) increases in\[p=\frac{w}{c}\]either \(w\) is getting higher, or \(c\) is getting lower, or both. For instance, if \(p=2\), \(w=6\), and \(c=3\), what are possible values of \(w,c\) if I increased \(p=4\)?

  4. shadmanr163
    • 4 years ago
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    6=36/6

  5. badreferences
    • 4 years ago
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    Very good. You noticed that \(w\) increased (by a larger margin than \(c\))? Now, returning to the previous question, what if I reduced \(p=1\)?

  6. shadmanr163
    • 4 years ago
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    if reduced by one then 1=infinite no of solutions?

  7. badreferences
    • 4 years ago
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    Yes, there are an infinite number of solutions. I'm asking what are possible solutions.

  8. shadmanr163
    • 4 years ago
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    like 6/6

  9. badreferences
    • 4 years ago
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    Yup. Noticed now how \(c\) increased by a larger margin than \(w\)? So what do you think: does \(p\) increase and decrease directly or inversely with \(c\) and \(w\)?

  10. shadmanr163
    • 4 years ago
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    inversely

  11. badreferences
    • 4 years ago
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    Not both. Which to which? If I increase \(p\), \(w\) generally grows larger and \(c\) smaller, so the number \(w/c\) is larger. If I decrease \(p\), \(w\) generally grows smaller, and \(c\) larger, so \(w/c\) grows smaller. Do you understand?

  12. shadmanr163
    • 4 years ago
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    Yeah! Thanks a lot so much. :-) Now I understand

  13. badreferences
    • 4 years ago
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    So, final test. Does \(c\) vary inversely or directly with \(p\)? What about \(w\)?

  14. badreferences
    • 4 years ago
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    Hey, I invested time into this. I want to see you actually learned something. :P

  15. shadmanr163
    • 4 years ago
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    Just, Hold on a bit I will get to it...

  16. badreferences
    • 4 years ago
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    @myininaya I know you're an actual teacher, you might be better here. :P

  17. shadmanr163
    • 4 years ago
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    inversely

  18. shadmanr163
    • 4 years ago
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    Am I right?

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