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elica85

  • 4 years ago

An LR circuit contains a battery hooked up to an inductor and a resistor in series. A switch effectively removes the battery from the circuit. The switch is initially closed. Immedeiately after the switch is opened, the voltage at location B is...

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  1. elica85
    • 4 years ago
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    |dw:1334851241226:dw|

  2. elica85
    • 4 years ago
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    equal to, higher than, or lower than the voltage at location A?

  3. ramkrishna
    • 4 years ago
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    higher than the voltage at location A because inductor opposes the change.

  4. rajathsbhat
    • 4 years ago
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    @ramkrishna is right about this in the most commonest sense. No offence@ramakrishna. But if you look at it from the point of view of pure physics, its wrong. Because an inductor is just a piece of wire. There cannot be a "potential difference" between the ends of a piece of metallic wire, remember!!! If you are confused, I suggest you read one of Prof. Walter Lewin's most excellent lecture supplements here: http://ocw.mit.edu/courses/physics/8-02-electricity-and-magnetism-spring-2002/lecture-notes/lecsup41.pdf

  5. elica85
    • 4 years ago
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    inductor acts like a piece of wire when connected to battery. i'm sorry, i didn't make it clear in the drawing, the battery disconnects from the circuit so now the inductor does not act as just a piece of wire. it keeps the current flowing for time t.

  6. elica85
    • 4 years ago
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    i don't understand how to get potential difference without any given values. V_R=-IR and V_L=-LdI/dt

  7. rajathsbhat
    • 4 years ago
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    even then it is a piece of wire

  8. elica85
    • 4 years ago
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    but there is potential difference...?

  9. rajathsbhat
    • 4 years ago
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    no no... you've got it all wrong. This is all a misconception. that is why I posted the link. Read carefully and find out for yourselves!!!

  10. ramkrishna
    • 4 years ago
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    a current carrying loop has a net magnetic flux. and whenever there is change in magnetic flux the loop will oppose that. (Lenz's law)

  11. rajathsbhat
    • 4 years ago
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    all of you who think there is a "potential difference" between the ends of an inductor should seriously watch this video completely: http://ocw.mit.edu/courses/physics/8-02-electricity-and-magnetism-spring-2002/video-lectures/lecture-16-electromagnetic-induction/ PLEASE FOR THE SAKE OF CORRECT UNDERSTANDING

  12. elica85
    • 4 years ago
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    thank you i will be watching it soon but must study so i have no time right this moment. thx~

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