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CoffeeEyes

  • 4 years ago

Jamal’s teacher gave him the following figure and asked him to provide a statement that would guarantee lines a and b are parallel.

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  1. CoffeeEyes
    • 4 years ago
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    Which statement should Jamal use to prove that lines a and b are parallel? ∠3 = 120° ∠7 = 120° ∠2 = 60° ∠4 = 60°

  2. tfitz17
    • 4 years ago
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    The second answer is correct. Angles on a straight line add up to 180 so Angle 2 = 60 Alternate angles also equal 180 so Angle 4 = 60 and Angle 3 = 120 Now you need to find a corresponding angle on the other line and Angle 7 is the only option you're given so if that equals 120, the rule of corresponding angles means that the lines are parallel. Hope this helps! :)

  3. CoffeeEyes
    • 4 years ago
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    Thank you so much. That was the answer I got but I did not completely understand why! Thanks. Not to be rude but is there any way you could check out the question before this and help me out? It's a closed question.

  4. CoffeeEyes
    • 4 years ago
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    :)

  5. tfitz17
    • 4 years ago
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    I'm pretty sure they're both correct, they just use a different angle. One uses Angles 1 and 3 and 4 and 3 The other uses 1 and 2 and 3 and 2

  6. CoffeeEyes
    • 4 years ago
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    Thank you so much. :)

  7. tfitz17
    • 4 years ago
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    No worries :)

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