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ketz

What is the Internal energy of a falling ball??

  • one year ago
  • one year ago

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  1. shivam_bhalla
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    @experimentX , @Siddharth18 , Is Internal energy = Potential energy??

    • one year ago
  2. Siddharth18
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    @ketz is the question in context of mechanics or thermodynamics?

    • one year ago
  3. ketz
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    Thermodynamics question!

    • one year ago
  4. Siddharth18
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    if that's the case then i guess @shivam_bhalla has got it right

    • one year ago
  5. shivam_bhalla
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    I would say , do you want to consider friction and other viscous force in air? If yes, then falling ball internal energy increases

    • one year ago
  6. ketz
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    I think it has zero internal energy since there is no change in the kinetic and potential energies of the molecules found inside the ball!!!

    • one year ago
  7. ketz
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    ΔU=0 I think!

    • one year ago
  8. Siddharth18
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    but one thing confuses me we have considered only the gravitational potential energy but what about the bond energy and static electric energy which constitute the total potential energy of the system

    • one year ago
  9. Siddharth18
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    @ketz if u luk from an inertial frame ,the molecules will be having KE

    • one year ago
  10. shivam_bhalla
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    @Siddharth18 is absolutely right :)

    • one year ago
  11. shivam_bhalla
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    Looks like you are still not convinved @ketz . Imagine you are sitting in a train and you are seeing a passenger sit next to you . For you he appears stationary. Why?? because you are viewing from non-inertial reference. If you are looking from ground, you will see the passenger moving(i.e having Kinetic energy). Hopefully this brings clarity to you

    • one year ago
  12. Vincent-Lyon.Fr
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    Hi! Better go back to definitions! Have a look at the words at the end of the second sentence. This is why internal energy is called 'internal'! http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Internal_energy

    • one year ago
  13. shivam_bhalla
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    @Vincent-Lyon.Fr , looks like you are right and I am wrong . :D . and the answer to the question is zero @ketz

    • one year ago
  14. Vincent-Lyon.Fr
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    @shivam_bhalla: You gave the answer to the question: "What is the CHANGE in internal energy for a falling ball" The question was : "What is the Internal energy of a falling ball?" So the answer must be: "The same as when it is at rest".

    • one year ago
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