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pythagoras123

  • 2 years ago

At an art exhibition, there were 280 men and 450 women in Hall A. In Hall B, there were 220 men and 665 women. Some men moved from Hall A to Hall B and some women moved from Hall B to Hall A such that 20% of the people in Hall A and 50% of the people in Hall B are men. How many people are there in Hall B in the end?

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  1. campbell_st
    • 2 years ago
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    I don't know much about art.... but I know what I like... dogs playing poker... dogs playing pool...

  2. pythagoras123
    • 2 years ago
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    help @satellite73

  3. Aditya790
    • 2 years ago
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    Can't come up with any elegant way to do the question, so we'll just have to stick with good old "take this to be x and that to be y" method. Let the men who moved to hall B be x. Let the women who moved to hall A be y. Now, the population of the rooms is something like, Hall A: 280-x men and 450+y women Hall B: 220+x men and 665-y women Data given: 20% of Hall A are men. 50% of Hall B are women. Each point of data gives one equation in x and y. You get two equations. Solve them and you should be able to find the number of people in Hall B.

  4. hashsam1
    • 2 years ago
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    so i solved this on the paper and got women=370=y men=75=x 665-370=295 220=75=295 total=590 in B

  5. hashsam1
    • 2 years ago
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    220+75=295 *

  6. kropot72
    • 2 years ago
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    I got the same result. There were 590 people in hall B at the end.

  7. hashsam1
    • 2 years ago
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    :D

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