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medisynergi

  • 2 years ago

What is the best way to learn Mathematics?

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  1. Callisto
    • 2 years ago
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    It depends, but falling in love with it would be the best way, I think :S

  2. FoolForMath
    • 2 years ago
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    I am trying to figure that out too.

  3. heyhey111
    • 2 years ago
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    practice

  4. SmoothMath
    • 2 years ago
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    Learn concepts. Make sense of the concepts in your head. Put them in your own words and try to justify them to yourself. Then start to look at how those concepts apply to problems, both real life and homework problems. Connect concepts to other concepts and things you already know. Possibly the worst way is this: Memorizing step by step procedures. If you're doing procedures without knowing the concepts behind why you are doing them or why they work, you will not be at all versatile. You won't be able to recognize when the procedures apply, and a slight change in the problem will confuse you as to how to proceed.

  5. anjali_pant
    • 2 years ago
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    Don't "learn" mathematics ! Its a like a deep ocean ; without testing the water , you can't estimate anything. So just DIVE IN !!!!!!!!

  6. FoolForMath
    • 2 years ago
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    In mathematics you don't understand things. You just get used to them ~ Von Neumann

  7. anjali_pant
    • 2 years ago
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    Who's this eminent personality ?

  8. anjali_pant
    • 2 years ago
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    *" VON NEUMANN"

  9. FoolForMath
    • 2 years ago
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    *sigh*

  10. anjali_pant
    • 2 years ago
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    @FoolForMath dont just vanish , explain ! :p

  11. FoolForMath
    • 2 years ago
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    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/John_von_Neumann

  12. estudier
    • 2 years ago
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    Tricky one. You can't learn it all, exponentially growing pile of paperwork. Usually supposed to go in "layers", probably right early on. If you know where you want to go, it might be better to attempt some kind of vertical learning.

  13. FoolForMath
    • 2 years ago
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    I am only familiar with his works in linear programming, game theory, computer science and numerical analysis.

  14. anjali_pant
    • 2 years ago
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    Actually @FoolForMath is "big time" lazy :p , so here's a short intro of John Von Neumann , all by myself ! :p John Von Neumann was a Hungarian-American mathematician and polymath who made major contributions to a vast number of fields,[1] including set theory, functional analysis, quantum mechanics, ergodic theory, geometry, fluid dynamics, economics, linear programming, game theory, computer science, numerical analysis, hydrodynamics, and statistics, as well as many other mathematical fields. He is generally regarded as one of the greatest mathematicians in modern history. Von Neumann was a pioneer of the application of operator theory to quantum mechanics, in the development of functional analysis, a principal member of the Manhattan Project and the Institute for Advanced Study in Princeton (as one of the few originally appointed), and a key figure in the development of game theory[1][7] and the concepts of cellular automata,[1] the universal constructor, and the digital computer. Von Neumann's mathematical analysis of the structure of self-replication preceded the discovery of the structure of DNA.[8] In a short list of facts about his life he submitted to the National Academy of Sciences, he stated "The part of my work I consider most essential is that on quantum mechanics, which developed in Göttingen in 1926, and subsequently in Berlin in 1927–1929. Also, my work on various forms of operator theory, Berlin 1930 and Princeton 1935–1939; on the ergodic theorem, Princeton, 1931–1932." Along with Teller and Stanisław Ulam, von Neumann worked out key steps in the nuclear physics involved in thermonuclear reactions and the hydrogen bomb. Von Neumann wrote 150 published papers in his life; 60 in pure mathematics, 20 in physics, and 60 in applied mathematics. His last work, an unfinished manuscript written while in the hospital and later published in book form as The Computer and the Brain, gives an indication of the direction of his interests at the time of his death.

  15. FoolForMath
    • 2 years ago
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    Spamming ^^ :P

  16. anjali_pant
    • 2 years ago
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    LOL

  17. precal
    • 2 years ago
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    Find ways that math apply to your life. Math is all around us. The more you find how it applys to your life, the more it will hold your interest. Math is a journey for us all.

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